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Thread: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

  1. #1
    Simon Evans Guest

    Default Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Well, well, well,

    Just received my new copy of Today's Pilot (a Real World Flying Magazine) and what do I find in the March issue (Issue 17)..? An indepth article about IFR flight...illustrated by pictures from FS2000..!!!

    The article is entitled `instrument flying` and angles-in from the viewpoint that even the best VFR pilot can find themelves in temporary IFR conditions which require short-term instrument flying in order to extricate themselves from the situation.

    Focussing on the 2d panel of the Cessna 182, it uses FS2000 to identify the visual cues `out the window` the VFR pilot relies upon, and the instrument scan that will be required once the ground is no longer visible. Lots of `before` and `after` shots...

    Very effective in demonstrating the points being raised, and obviously far cheaper to achieve than sending up a pilot in a plane to look for deliberate whiteout conditions.

    Once again, the goodness of the sim that is Flight Simulator shines through - this time being used as an educational tool that potentially saves lives. Clearly, the gutter press will NOT be making widespread mention of this use of Flight Sim as it involves NOT flying into solid objects so I thought some of us here might appreciate the irony, in the light of recent press coverage.



    Simon Evans

  2. #2

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    On a similar note, Simon, yesterday I received a copy of Plane & Pilot. One of the articles discusses how to go about getting your PPL. In the article, the author at least makes mention of the fact that he had used Microsoft Flight Simulator for some time. Although his purpose for mentioning it was to illustrate how different the simulator is to real life flying (especially in regard to tactile feedback).

    Since September, I have noticed more and more references to MSFS, many of which were quite positive. Although, the vast majority of the public has only seen it used to illustrate how to fly a 767 into a building. :-(

    Take care, Simon.

    [hr color=gray]http://home.earthlink.net/~snyders2000/ga.jpg :-wave


  3. #3
    CanuckInUSA Guest

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON Feb-06-02 AT 11:06AM (EDT)[/font][p]So much about safe IFR flight (besides knowning the fundamentals of instrument scan, instrument interpretation and aircraft control as well as knowing the weather and the ATC system) is related to situation awareness. Last night I was reading an article in AOPA's latest rag concerning a 19000 hour ATP operating IFR under part 91 who died crashing into terrain and took two others with himself. What was the cause? The dude checked the weather and all of the NOTAMS but failed to check his AFD in which the approach he was using was no longer operational due to the fact that a tower with guide wires had be errected in the approaches path. This solidifies all the more reason to be prudent in gathering all the information required prior to a flight (a requirement not as critical in simulated flight).

    PS: For those who think that the outage of this approach would have been listed in the NOTAMs, be aware that once it is added to the AFD, it no longer needs to be listed as a NOTAM (at least this was one of the messages in the article).



  4. #4

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Today's Pilot? That's the huge glossy mag from the UK correct? I have a couple, but they are expensive, being that you gotta ship half a tree's worth of paper across the pond. Great magazine though.

  5. #5
    Simon Evans Guest

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    >Today's Pilot? That's the huge glossy
    >mag from the UK correct?
    >I have a couple, but
    >they are expensive, being that
    >you gotta ship half a
    >tree's worth of paper across
    >the pond. Great magazine though.
    >


    Yep, that's the one.



    Simon Evans


  6. #6

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Not being a PPL, excuse what might be a dumb question, but don't they cover the basics of IFR when you learn to fly? I realise that getting Instrument Rating is a whole new ball game, but aren't private pilots tought some emergency know-how? Enough to get them clear of danger at least?

    Adam

  7. #7
    Simon Evans Guest

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Yes, the JAR-PPL requires as part of the Skills Test at the end of the course `flight by sole reference to instruments`. comprising straight and level flight, climbs, descents and turns.

    But for sport flyers and occasional pilots who only ever fly VFR that could well be the only time they ever fly using instruments.

    In all honesty, how many VFR pilots ever go out specifically to practice IFR flying? Very few I'd say. It's one of those skills you don't need - until you REALLY need it, if ony to perform a 180 and reverse course without descending.

    Simon Evans



  8. #8

    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Bloody hell - that's scary. I'm hoping to start a PPL course in the next year or so and assuming I pass at some point, this is one thing I'll definately keep in mind. Every now and then I browse through the AAIB reports and it's frightening how many people come to grief from accidentally flying into low clouds.

    I take it that if you're not rated on instruments you can pay an instructor to refresh you every year or two?

    Sorry - I know this is off topic, but good advice is hard to come by :)

    Adam

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    Going out with an instructor every couple of years to do hood work is only going to waste money. If you are VFR pilot, best thing is to avoid IMC at all costs, even if it means landing in a cow pasture. First time going into a cloud can be very disorienting if you don't have good instrument skills.
    Next best thing is to get your instrument ticket right away. Not only will you develop a scan that might save your life, but you will really learn how to fly the airplane.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Default RE: Art, imitating life, imitating art....

    What most VFR pilots need to practice is recovery from an unusual attitude under the hood. I think they did a study and found that the average time the typical pilot could keep the airplane upright was 5 minutes.


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