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Thread: IFR Book- "Instrument Flying"

  1. #1
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    Default IFR Book- "Instrument Flying"

    I've been digging into my bookshelf for things I've not read in years, and I chose Instrument Flying by Richard L. Taylor -- good memories and an excellent refresher, even though written in 1972.

    I've noticed that a large part of the simmers here seem to want to fly IFR, though often mostly with autopilot, but are a tad short of knowledge of the real world version. Of course most of that knowledge is not required by the sim, but often there are questions on this forum that indicate to me that certain folks might like to have a better picture of what real world IFR (not just IMC, but IFR) flying is like.

    So as I am reading through this book, reminding myself of some things that no longer come readily to mind, and even picking up something that I don't recall seeing before (though I've read this off and on since mid-'70s), it occurred to me that there are many folks here who might benefit from the book. The latest edition (4th edition) dated Aug. 1997 is available on Amazon, but I also see some earlier versions on eBay for as little as a couple of bucks.

    Now for the reason I recommend even the 1972 version that I have, outdated as some things are. First, most procedures have changed little, except for some minor rule changes and many avionics differences, but the insights that Mr. Taylor gives still apply in today's IFR environment, and he explains things so well, with some humor included, that people from fairly new simmers to moderately experienced Private Pilots can get a feel for what real world IFR is like, covering almost everything except weather, including holding patterns, instrument approaches, explanations of things like EFC/EAC (Expect Further/Approach Clearance) times, lost communications procedures, cockpit organization, understanding ATC clearances, VOR navigation, use of charts, and much more. And at places even 20,000 hour airline captains can pick up a hint or two.

    It's a fun and informative read.

    As what could almost be called a companion book (though written by someone else long before) Weather Flying by Robert N. Buck, a long time TWA captain and weather researcher, covers flying with different kinds of weather, and is just as valuable today as when it was first written (it's on at least the 5th edition now), and makes an excellent companion to Instrument Flying, as well as just by itself being a valuable read.

    A third book, Stick and Rudder by Wolfgang Langewiesche, is still the bible today on basic flying and aerodynamics as seen from a pilot's perspective, discussing how the airplane feels and reacts and why in fairly simple terminology, but so well done that this 1944 book still stands the test of time.

    Together, the three books above should be on every pilot's bookshelf, and can be very valuable for simmers who want to understand a lot more than just how to get the autopilot to take off and land the airplane.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lnuss View Post
    I've been digging into my bookshelf for things I've not read in years, and I chose Instrument Flying by Richard L. Taylor -- good memories and an excellent refresher, even though written in 1972.

    I've noticed that a large part of the simmers here seem to want to fly IFR, though often mostly with autopilot, but are a tad short of knowledge of the real world version. Of course most of that knowledge is not required by the sim, but often there are questions on this forum that indicate to me that certain folks might like to have a better picture of what real world IFR (not just IMC, but IFR) flying is like.

    So as I am reading through this book, reminding myself of some things that no longer come readily to mind, and even picking up something that I don't recall seeing before (though I've read this off and on since mid-'70s), it occurred to me that there are many folks here who might benefit from the book. The latest edition (4th edition) dated Aug. 1997 is available on Amazon, but I also see some earlier versions on eBay for as little as a couple of bucks.

    Now for the reason I recommend even the 1972 version that I have, outdated as some things are. First, most procedures have changed little, except for some minor rule changes and many avionics differences, but the insights that Mr. Taylor gives still apply in today's IFR environment, and he explains things so well, with some humor included, that people from fairly new simmers to moderately experienced Private Pilots can get a feel for what real world IFR is like, covering almost everything except weather, including holding patterns, instrument approaches, explanations of things like EFC/EAC (Expect Further/Approach Clearance) times, lost communications procedures, cockpit organization, understanding ATC clearances, VOR navigation, use of charts, and much more. And at places even 20,000 hour airline captains can pick up a hint or two.

    It's a fun and informative read.

    As what could almost be called a companion book (though written by someone else long before) Weather Flying by Robert N. Buck, a long time TWA captain and weather researcher, covers flying with different kinds of weather, and is just as valuable today as when it was first written (it's on at least the 5th edition now), and makes an excellent companion to Instrument Flying, as well as just by itself being a valuable read.

    A third book, Stick and Rudder by Wolfgang Langewiesche, is still the bible today on basic flying and aerodynamics as seen from a pilot's perspective, discussing how the airplane feels and reacts and why in fairly simple terminology, but so well done that this 1944 book still stands the test of time.

    Together, the three books above should be on every pilot's bookshelf, and can be very valuable for simmers who want to understand a lot more than just how to get the autopilot to take off and land the airplane.
    I read Richard L. Taylor's book when I first gravitated from gliders to powered aircraft. Would recommend it as a first step to any IFR flier contemplating moving to the idiosyncracies - yes, before moving to GPS, LNAV and any of that `newfangled rubbish`computer-flyin'. Use it as preamble to `CAP785 - Approval Requirements for Instrument Flight Procedures for Use in UK Airspace` or any FAA materiel.

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