Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43

Thread: Landing problems STILL! after seventeen years.

  1. #11

    Default

    Perfect landings are like making sure screw heads are vertical! I am Happy just to land on the airport!

    Christopher Tarana

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    416

    Default

    Andy,

    While "going back to (landing) basics" and being correctly lined up with the runway in any plane, be sure your surface wind is set either at zero knots or is coming from dead-ahead.

    I may be trying to kick in an already open door here but I'm reacting to your problem of not being able to land on the runway's center line and a side wind could be your basic cause. Take care though because a wind direction is not stored as part of any airport but must be set and saved as part of your saved (practice) flight. Every time you subsequently re-open that saved flight the wind direction at the airport concerned will automatically be set as previously saved together with that flight.

    Landing (and take offs) with side wind can always be practiced later.

    Good luck.

    Hans

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Manchester UK
    Posts
    3,362

    Default

    Hey not only on the centre line but on the touchdown markers lol. I call them the 'Aiming Bars'
    After this thread it has made me want to have another try, who else has it inspired?

    Col.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Westminster, CO
    Posts
    7,584

    Default

    A rapid dive towards my designated runway which I quite often manage, but not satisfactory for me and probably of the centre of the runway to boot.
    Slowing down will likely give you a steeper descent than diving, though you have to be careful not to overdo it. Diving trades altitude for speed and will tend to make you land further down the runway. I don't know which aircraft you're flying, but (for example only) lets say that your recommended approach speed is 130 kts, and you have stabilized at that 130 kts with flaps and gear extended, and that you realize you're too high. If you slow to 120 kts for a little while you'll find that you'll descend a bit steeper (it may not be immediately apparent), so can return to 130 kts before getting low enough to start the flare. Of course a simple power reduction (perhaps only a little bit) will also give you a steeper approach, and may be preferred, remembering to let the nose drop just a hair to maintain that 130 kts.**

    but I have in the past flown the lights,historic (dc3 etc)and others
    A DC-3 is not a light aircraft. A Cessna or Piper single engine aircraft (or a Cub) is a light aircraft, and they are much easier to learn in.

    Both you Larry have mentioned this.
    I have in the past tried that ,but don't remember any significant improvements in my landings .I will try again and see what occurs.
    When we mention looking at the far end of the runway, that's not for the entire approach, it's only once you start to flare. As you are coming down final, there will be a spot in the windshield that is NOT going up or down on the windshield. That spot is where, if you change nothing and remain stabilized, that your nose would plow into the ground. So you can adjust power and pitch attitude (maintain airspeed) to change the spot such that the place you want to land is the spot that doesn't move up or down. Once you have the knack, make that "aim point" just short of where you want to touch down, since flaring (NOW is the time to look at the far end) will cause you to touch a little beyond that "aim point."

    =================================
    ** Many things in aviation are counter intuitive, and this is one of them.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    7,289

    Default

    Like Hans says (and due to you not 'interacting' with ATC) the runway YOU choose might have a stiff side wind. Even the AP won't help you there. And there are 2 other things NEEDED (required?) if there is any 'wind' involved, and those are PITCH TRIM and 'Auto Rudder'= OFF!!!

    You can use AP for approach and then turn it off when at 100 ft or so, then hand land (using pitch trim and rudder) to 'attain' that CENTERLINE touch down. Doing sidewind landings take practice. Whether with a Cessna or a 747. Practice landings using 'Locked Spot' view. After doing a few dozen (hundred?) of those then the landings using VC (or 2D) will be much improved.

    On approach, line up center line to YOUR eyes, not the center of windscreen. Sorry, but that is how the sim 'works'. No fix for that. This is often a source of confusion for simmers. And all their landings are to the LEFT of centerline (of course).
    Chuck B
    Napamule
    i7 2600K @ 3.4 Ghz (Turbo-Boost to 3.877 Ghz), Asus P8H67 Pro, Super Talent 8 Gb DDR3/1333 Dual Channel, XFX Radeon R7-360B 2Gb DDR5, Corsair 650 W PSU, Dell 23 in (2048x1152), Windows7 Pro 64 bit, MS Sidewinder Precision 2 Joy, Logitech K-360 wireless KB & Mouse, Targus PAUK10U USB Keypad for Throttle (F1 to F4)/Spoiler/Tailhook/Wing Fold/Pitch Trim/Parking Brake/Snap to 2D Panel/View Change. Installed on 250 Gb (D. FS9 and FSX Acceleration (locked at 30 FPS).

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO USA KAPA, KLMO, 35CO
    Posts
    2,041

    Default

    I just want to climb and land in such a way that I don't get my imaginary Ticket yanked by the imaginary FAA, or get sued by some imaginary passenger who wrenched their imaginary back because of my imaginary landings!

    Alan

    "I created the Little Black Book to keep myself from getting killed..." -- Captain Elrey Borge Jeppesen
    AMD 1.9GB/8GB RAM/AMD VISION 1GB GPU/500 GB HDD/WIN 7 PRO 64/FS9 CFS CFS2

  7. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by napamule2 View Post
    Like Hans says (and due to you not 'interacting' with ATC) the runway YOU choose might have a stiff side wind. Even the AP won't help you there. And there are 2 other things NEEDED (required?) if there is any 'wind' involved, and those are PITCH TRIM and 'Auto Rudder'= OFF!!!

    You can use AP for approach and then turn it off when at 100 ft or so, then hand land (using pitch trim and rudder) to 'attain' that CENTERLINE touch down. Doing sidewind landings take practice. Whether with a Cessna or a 747. Practice landings using 'Locked Spot' view. After doing a few dozen (hundred?) of those then the landings using VC (or 2D) will be much improved.

    On approach, line up center line to YOUR eyes, not the center of windscreen. Sorry, but that is how the sim 'works'. No fix for that. This is often a source of confusion for simmers. And all their landings are to the LEFT of centerline (of course).
    Chuck B
    Napamule
    Hello
    I always know the direction of the wind at my destination airport as I use FsReal Weather.
    I download a snapshot of the world's weather then turn of FSrealweather (no live updates) and to be completely satisfied
    I will move my aircraft to my destination airport just to check the runway selected is the appropriate one for wind direction, when iam satisfied that it is ,I then move my aircraft back to my departure airport and having created a flight plan in FSNavigator I then fly the route.
    All a bit long winded, but it's all part of my daily flight selection and operation.

    Cheers to all
    PS with this thread going on, and another concerning the cloning of my PC.
    My brain is in full ache mode at the moment.
    PPS in another twist concerning my of centre landings I actually completed one of my best ones for a long time BUT! it was born out of near calamity as when using an Ifr approach I found myself about to crash as I realised I was not going to make it to the runway. I very quickly turned of the autopilot/autothrottle shoved the throttle levers open for a short burst ,turned onto the runway and executed a really good touchdown.
    Such is life part two.
    I will be of again very shortly to try yet again.
    Cheers to all
    Last edited by HoratioWondersocks; 10-25-2021 at 01:47 PM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Posts
    18,589

    Default

    Hey, Socks! I find a good, stiff drink helps with the landings, among other things!
    Mr Zippy Sent from my keyboard using "Whackamole", NudgeAKey + 2 Fingers

    No flight Sim installed until I get a new computer.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    191

    Default

    Climbs in transport category jets are made according to a speed schedule that differs a bit from one type to another, but would approximate the following for all:

    Rotate slowly (around 1-2 degrees per second) to around 7 degrees nose up to become airborne after reaching VR, and then continue to pitch up to around 15 degrees nose up (or maybe a bit more if you are light) so as to maintain a speed of around V2 plus 10-15 knots, and climb at this speed to your clean-up altitude, which is part of the particular procedure for each type, and varies from 1000 AGL to 3000 AGL (also varies by country for noise abatement purposes). This portion of the climb is made using pitch attitude to control airspeed; ie, to reduce speed if you are too fast, raise the nose a bit, and do the opposite to increase speed. This is what is known as a constant airspeed climb, and is what the autoflight does when in FLC mode, and much of the time also in VNAV mode.

    At clean up altitude, lower the nose to between 5 and 10 degrees nose up to increase speed, and as you pass the speeds for retracting the flaps notch by notch, do so. After flaps up, let the speed build up to 250 knots and then raise the nose to resume a constant airspeed climb at 250 until passing 10,000 feet, at which point lower the nose to accelerate to enroute climb speed (in the 290-320 knot range depending upon what the performance manual and/or FMC tells you is best economy). At some point in the low to mid 20 thousands of feet, your Mach number will increase to the climb Mach number, which is typically between Mach .70 and Mach .78, and from then on until you reach cruise altitude you maintain the Mach number with pitch, not the indicated airspeed. A constant Mach climb will result in a slow reduction of IAS, but that is normal as altitude increases.

    In VNAV, the autoflight will do all of this for you, and it may be instructive to watch it perform, in order to get an idea of exactly what pitch attitudes are involved at each segment of the climb. But in any event, when flying manually, it is whatever pitch attitude it may take to achieve or maintain the desired IAS or Mach number, or to accelerate at the various change points.

    Although you did not ask about descent, it is the reverse of the above. Thrust levers to idle, and using pitch attitude (lower the nose) maintain the cruise Mach number until you reach the IAS called for in descent, typically between 280 and 350 knots depending upon airplane type and also wind (headwind or tailwind - the FMC will often calculate this best economy descent speed for you). Hold that speed with pitch attitude until you get to just above 10,000 feet, and then more or less level off (raise the nose to near level pitch) so that the airplane slows to 250 knots. Lower the nose again, and descent in a constant airspeed descent at 250 knots until ATC slows you down or you need to slow down to extend flaps and landing gear as you get close (within around 10 miles, maybe a bit more) to the airport.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO USA KAPA, KLMO, 35CO
    Posts
    2,041

    Default

    Exactly what I needed to start, avallillo‚Äč! I haven't flown airliners before, but I want to give it a try, in a somewhat proper fashion. I'm just past remembering to adjust the weight and fuel when I select the airplane so I can get off the ground!

    Little steps...

    Alan

    "I created the Little Black Book to keep myself from getting killed..." -- Captain Elrey Borge Jeppesen
    AMD 1.9GB/8GB RAM/AMD VISION 1GB GPU/500 GB HDD/WIN 7 PRO 64/FS9 CFS CFS2

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-16-2014, 11:26 PM
  2. After 3 years I still can't run it :(
    By VespertineStar in forum FSX
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 10-23-2009, 12:03 PM
  3. After All These Years She Is Still So Beautiful
    By ketakopter in forum MSFS Screen Shot Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-18-2005, 09:58 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •