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Thread: Why Sedona?

  1. #1
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    Default Why Sedona?

    I took a couple of lessons today from the MSFS "instructor." I passed the test on level flight at 5,500 feet over Sedona. The next was landing. The instructor claimed she had lined me up to land at the airport there. I looked over the nose, and every which other way, but the runway was nowhere in sight. I had to do a lot of flying this way and that to find it (no GPS available in the lesson). When I found the airport, I made multiple attempts to line up with the Sedona runway (on a mesa), until I finally exited the lesson in frustration. But that's on me. On the other hand, I thought the lesson was supposed to include a glide path to follow, which wasn't there. In any case, I don't understand why Asobo decided to offer lessons out of Sedona to novice sim flyers like me. It's not the easiest environment, topographically. Just wondering ...
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  2. #2
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    Default

    They could have picked Cody, Wyoming and made it worse?
    I suspect they wanted to show off the spectacular scenery!
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by plainsman View Post
    They could have picked Cody, Wyoming and made it worse?
    I suspect they wanted to show off the spectacular scenery!
    Yes, it is spectacular. But I'm not into sight-seeing yet; not until I can land consistently.
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  4. #4

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    Sedona is on a plateau, which makes setting up the approach difficult because the approach becomes 100% dependent on the visual picture of the runway; there is no "floor" under you to help you gauge your height above the runway.

    You could prepare ahead and get your barometric pressure set correctly and have the runway elevation available so that your can calculate what altitude you should start your approach at. Without those numbers available, and never having flown into Sedona before, a low time pilot might be better to chose an alternate place to land.

    It was a training flight, one lesson it should have taught you is to always spend some time getting prepared for a landing at an airport you've never been to before. Sedona has a lot of lessons for a new pilot though.

    Edit:
    Reading your response to Plainsman, if you're just trying to be able to land, you shouldn't be at Sedona.
    Last edited by sfojimbo; 01-21-2021 at 11:15 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Default

    Out of curiosity, I went to the training course and did this landing activity. The approach, I thought, was a bit steep as you are put quite close to the airstrip but 2000 feet above it. The result is that the airstrip is easily hidden beneath the aircraft's nose when in straight and level flight. Drop the nose a tad and the airstrip is there right in front of you.
    There are no special guides for you but the aircraft is set up for landing. If you do as the instructor says, drop the nose, trim, and line up the numbers and keep them steady in your sight picture, the aircraft will almost land itself with you just dropping flaps and giving it a bit of throttle now and then as needed. Stick with it, don't be disheartened, and you will be surprised at how soon you can master it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aptosflier View Post
    I had to do a lot of flying this way and that to find it (no GPS available in the lesson). When I found the airport, I made multiple attempts to line up with the Sedona runway (on a mesa), until I finally exited the lesson in frustration.
    I've done those lessons too, as everyone should, and there are waypoint markers along your route which you must pass before the next one appears. If you miss one, you can go back and pass through it again. There's also some text along the top of the screen when flying the pattern to land, telling you which leg of the approach you're on.
    Take your time and have fun - NOBODY gets it right first time - when you DO get it right, the lady instructor is real proud of you!
    Last edited by tiger1962; 01-22-2021 at 08:20 AM.
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  7. #7

    Default Why Sedona

    I have to say that I actually had no problems with completing the flight lessons that were included in the new MSFS 2020, though I have to say that I think the ones in FSX were more comprehensive and were better done than in the new program. As was said before, I have a feeling that they chose Sedona in order to show off the beautiful scenery of the American southwest that the program is capable of generating. I do agree that Sedona may not have been the best airport for them to have chosen for the introductory flight lessons but I did like it for the Landing Challenge. On the positive side of things though, one advantage of Sedona being on a plateau is that if you come in shallow on your approach you have less of a chance of flying into the ground and landing short of the runway since the ground on the approach is well below the level of the runway.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsproles View Post
    Drop the nose a tad and the airstrip is there right in front of you.
    There are no special guides for you but the aircraft is set up for landing. If you do as the instructor says, drop the nose, trim, and line up the numbers and keep them steady in your sight picture, the aircraft will almost land itself with you just dropping flaps and giving it a bit of throttle now and then as needed. Stick with it, don't be disheartened, and you will be surprised at how soon you can master it.
    Thanks, I will try it again. I have been trying to learn to land at our local muni airport (Watsonville, Calif.) without instruction. I get buffeted around quite a bit, even though I scotched real-world weather. My difficulty right now is coming in too high and having to go around, again, and again, and again.
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  9. #9

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    In all fairness, I'll agree that I too had to find the runway, but since I had a feeling it was underneath me I instinctively pitched down and found it.

    The scenery is quite impressive though, and I did enjoy the lessons to this point, half of them I guess.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aptosflier View Post
    Thanks, I will try it again. I have been trying to learn to land at our local muni airport (Watsonville, Calif.) without instruction. I get buffeted around quite a bit, even though I scotched real-world weather. My difficulty right now is coming in too high and having to go around, again, and again, and again.
    I suggest that you continue with the MSFS training and learn how to do circuits. That will teach you what altitude you need to maintain while in the circuit and what height you need to be as you fly finals. By keeping your eye on the altimeter you will learn how to set yourself up for a landing. And don't worry about Sedona being on a mesa; you concentrate on the runway numbers like the instructor says and that is all that matters.

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