Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Can't see the ground during takeoff

  1. #1

    Default Can't see the ground during takeoff

    This is such a basic newbie question, I know, and I'm pretty sure I know the answer, but sitting in a Cessna 172 (in my sim) I can't see the ground during takeoff due to the pitch of the aircraft. Is this how it is IRL? I just want to make sure I don't need a couple of phone books to sit on.
    Prepar3d v4: HP Omen Desktop. Intel Core i7-8700K (6 Core, 3.7GHz), NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB dedicated GDDR5X), 16GB RAM, 2TB Hard Drive, 1TB SSD, 512GB SSD, Windows 10.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Westminster, CO
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    I can't see the ground during takeoff due to the pitch of the aircraft. Is this how it is IRL?
    Nope. The "pitch" of the aircraft is level during takeoff untill you rotate, so that shouldn't be much of an issue. Are you using the "2D" cockpit? That could be the source of your problem. Using the "virtual" cockpit (VC) you should be able to adjust your view in the sim to see the ground ahead. If that doesn't work, you can edit the aircraft.cfg file to change the "eyepoint."

    In a real world C-172, it's a bit more like sitting in a car, as far as visibility, though the panel may seem a little high. The pilot seat is adjustable fore and aft, as well as vertically, so that only the very shortest people (I've known a few) need cushions (they may need them in a car, too). So if you're 4' 10" you may need a cushion or two, but not otherwise.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm sorry, Larry. I didn't word my post correctly. This is after I rotate during the initial climb.
    Prepar3d v4: HP Omen Desktop. Intel Core i7-8700K (6 Core, 3.7GHz), NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB dedicated GDDR5X), 16GB RAM, 2TB Hard Drive, 1TB SSD, 512GB SSD, Windows 10.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    San Francisco, California
    Posts
    17,687

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk View Post
    I'm sorry, Larry. I didn't word my post correctly. This is after I rotate during the initial climb.
    I think you may want to see the nice blue sky rather than the mean ole ground coming at you! I'll let Larry carry on from here.
    Mr Zippy Sent from my keyboard using "Whackamole", NudgeAKey + 2 Fingers

    Emachines T3418 AMD 3400+ processor 2GHZ/256KB L2 Cashe 2Gig Ram 160Gig HDD NVidia GEForce 6100 GPU Running WinXP Home Can't believe it still works! Running FSX Standard with SP1 and SP2

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Westminster, CO
    Posts
    7,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk View Post
    I'm sorry, Larry. I didn't word my post correctly. This is after I rotate during the initial climb.
    When you rotate the nose will come up and, at least partially, block your forward view of the runway, but it shouldn't be so high as to totally block the horizon -- if it is then you need to lower your nose. But you can see very well out the sides of the aircraft and off at 30º to 40º to either side over the nose, which is adequate for proper aircraft control. Don't EVER depend solely on staring straight ahead for aircraft control (how do you think we fly a Cub from the back seat or a Stearman from either seat?) -- you can use peripheral vision and the things you CAN see for proper control and navigation.

    So as long as you can see the runway ahead (in a tri-gear) and the horizon once established in a climb attitude, you are properly situated vertically in your seat and will do fine. Part of your flight training is to learn the various reference points you need for different parts of the flight, for different situations and (aircraft) attitudes.

    BTW, in a Cub, Stearman, et al, you'll learn to do S-turns while taxiing and clear the runway ahead (visually) before getting lined up on the runway, then will use peripheral vision, looking a little to the side, angles of part of the aircraft with runway edge, etc. etc. for takeoff until the tail is up -- similar for landing once the tail is down.

    So unless you're unusually short you probably won't need cushions -- the flight school may have some loaners anyway.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrzippy View Post
    I think you may want to see the nice blue sky rather than the mean ole ground coming at you! I'll let Larry carry on from here.
    This is very true!

    Quote Originally Posted by lnuss View Post
    When you rotate the nose will come up and, at least partially, block your forward view of the runway, but it shouldn't be so high as to totally block the horizon -- if it is then you need to lower your nose. But you can see very well out the sides of the aircraft and off at 30º to 40º to either side over the nose, which is adequate for proper aircraft control. Don't EVER depend solely on staring straight ahead for aircraft control (how do you think we fly a Cub from the back seat or a Stearman from either seat?) -- you can use peripheral vision and the things you CAN see for proper control and navigation.

    So as long as you can see the runway ahead (in a tri-gear) and the horizon once established in a climb attitude, you are properly situated vertically in your seat and will do fine. Part of your flight training is to learn the various reference points you need for different parts of the flight, for different situations and (aircraft) attitudes.

    BTW, in a Cub, Stearman, et al, you'll learn to do S-turns while taxiing and clear the runway ahead (visually) before getting lined up on the runway, then will use peripheral vision, looking a little to the side, angles of part of the aircraft with runway edge, etc. etc. for takeoff until the tail is up -- similar for landing once the tail is down.

    So unless you're unusually short you probably won't need cushions -- the flight school may have some loaners anyway.
    What a great explanation! Thank you. I'm not going to worry about then. I'm seeing what I should be seeing.
    Prepar3d v4: HP Omen Desktop. Intel Core i7-8700K (6 Core, 3.7GHz), NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB dedicated GDDR5X), 16GB RAM, 2TB Hard Drive, 1TB SSD, 512GB SSD, Windows 10.

  7. Default

    In 2D view, this has always been a problem for many FS pilots no matter FS9, FSX, P3D. My solution is to assign two keyboard keys in the Menu - Options/Controls/Buttons-Keys feature to the actions "View (always pan up)" and "View (always pan down)". Always pan up gives the appearance of gradually LOWERING the seat, panning down gives the appearance of gradually RAISING the seat (Reverse Polish logic I guess).

    Personally I use "Q" and "A" to do this and it works like a charm. Easy to remember, and to find right after takeoff, as well as setting up initial view to your likng on the ground.

  8. #8

    Default

    Good idea. I'm going to try that. Thanks!
    Prepar3d v4: HP Omen Desktop. Intel Core i7-8700K (6 Core, 3.7GHz), NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB dedicated GDDR5X), 16GB RAM, 2TB Hard Drive, 1TB SSD, 512GB SSD, Windows 10.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk View Post
    Good idea. I'm going to try that. Thanks!
    So, what speed are you climbing at?
    Might be advisable to go faster as this has the effect of lowering the nose, improving the visibility. Normal climb speed for the 172 is 85 knots. Try 110-120 kts and see the effect on climb rate...

  10. #10

    Default

    Yeah, usually around 80-85 kts, then between 500 and 700 feet per min.
    Prepar3d v4: HP Omen Desktop. Intel Core i7-8700K (6 Core, 3.7GHz), NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (11GB dedicated GDDR5X), 16GB RAM, 2TB Hard Drive, 1TB SSD, 512GB SSD, Windows 10.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 64
    Last Post: 02-14-2019, 05:20 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-24-2013, 12:02 PM
  3. During a day at Athens Venizelos Airport can you (maybe) see... PART 1
    By bofredrik in forum MSFS Screen Shot Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-30-2003, 02:13 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-30-2003, 01:28 PM
  5. loss of control during taxi/takeoff
    By zekemacneil in forum FS2002
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-18-2002, 08:40 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •