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Thread: Pilot Profile: Larry N.

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Pilot Profile: Larry N.

    In 1969 my CAP Squadron Commander offered me the use of his 1946 Aeronca Chief to learn to fly for $5/hour wet (C-150 was going for $12/hr). He also knew a good instructor (outstanding, it turns out). Jim kept his Chief at a farmer's 1900 foot grass strip, about half an hour from my house.

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    Jim's Chief taxiing to parking.

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    Jim, me (orange flight suit) and 3868E at a SARCAP (practice search mission).

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    Our Cadets washing a DC-3 (they got a nice ride) at Joliet Municipal.

    After the first 40 hours, I met the VA's requirements so I switched to a part 141 School, Mainline Aviation, at the Joliet, IL airport, where I completed my Private, Commercial and got partway through the Instrument before moving to Albuquerque. There I finished my instrument and also got my Multi and double I.

    A couple of years later, I was fortunate enough to start towing gliders for Pegasus Aerial Sports, where I was also able to fly (and teach in) a wide variety of aircraft, including the Grumman American T-Cat, Lynx, Cheetah and Tiger; various Cessnas; a PA-11, Champ; Stearman and many more. I also picked up my glider Commercial there, and towed banners.

    In 1995, while I'd been teaching (and doing other flying) at Jeffco Airport (BJC) near Denver, I bought into a Piper L-21 (more pictures), with seven other partners. This military version of the Super Cub was painted in 1953 Army colors, and was a delight to fly. After a number of enjoyable years, I sold my share just before 9/11.

    Unfortunately, I've been diabetic for a while now, so no longer fly real aircraft.
    Last edited by lnuss; 12-07-2012 at 11:39 AM.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  2. #2
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    Gee Larry, you've got quite a background. No wonder you're so good at answering questions here :-)

  3. #3
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    Yes, I was very fortunate, though it seemed like all too little at the time, but looking back I can see there is a lot more there than I'd realized. Combine the experience with discussions with a variety of people I met over the years, and with an intense interest in aviation magazines and books, and I've been exposed to a lot. There are many on here who have more overall experience, and many with more up to date information in some areas, but few with the variety. Add in FS, and the fact that I still sim with the very good friend that I used to fly for many years ago...

    And thanks to you, Nels, for providing such a fine platform for simming tools, add-ons and discussions. You had a lot of fine people here over the years.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

  4. #4

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    Larry,

    You are defintely FlightSim.com family like so many others that have shared the years with us. The people are the most important here, above anything else. They come first and they are the reasons we all share information with each other. It's the reason we put up a Pilots & Profiles sub-forum, it's why we do Free Focus sections for the flight simulator developers and it's the very reason this site exists.

    Now that we have a Real World Aviation forum, I'm going to figure out how to get your incredible Flying Techniques and Real Aviation FAQ into the new Tutorials sub-forum we just created lol.

    That document is a masterpiece and just as much a series of tutorials as it is FAQ.

    Dan

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Mt Gambier South Australia
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    hi Larry.
    Nice pics. You know, an outstanding instructor should have taught you to treat ALL props as LIVE.
    You certainly do not learn on then. That’s how people lose arms. (First thing I was taught in flight school)
    Yes, yes, I know.
    skytrek

  6. #6
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    Believe it or not, he did (he's not in that pic). But being human...

    I guess I should mention, too, that the referenced pic was taken about 1970.
    Last edited by lnuss; 02-14-2013 at 01:00 PM.

    Larry N.

    As Skylab would say:
    Remember: Aviation is NOT an exact Science!

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