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Thread: problem with taxiing dc-3

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by JSMR View Post
    Scott? Um…awkward. Have you…um…looked in the mirror lately? I ah….hmmmm. don’t think the ladies would be interested in you.
    Shows what you know.


    Here's a picture of my beautiful wife, Sal:

    Name:  SAL 9000 face plate 15440721680.jpg
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    And here's the sonogram of our son:

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    He's due in a few weeks. I'm so proud.
    If the pilot's good, see, I mean, if he's really sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... hee hee. Oh, you ought to see it sometime, it's a sight. A big plane like a 52 - vrooom! Ha! Its jet exhaust frying chickens in the barnyard! Ha ha!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,231

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott_295 View Post
    Shows what you know.


    Here's a picture of my beautiful wife, Sal:


    And here's the sonogram of our son:


    He's due in a few weeks. I'm so proud.

    Ooh. She's quite attractive.
    Well, the son, hey, he may be all zero's and one's now, but one day he'll be something. Just like his old man.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Oklahoma
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    361

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    I know it’s is an old thread, but a real world experience. One of my cousins, pilot wit ATR and B737 qualified, not a profession but occasionally takes on commercial flying assignments, not too long ago took on the task of ferrying a DC-3 from Florida to a buyer in Montana. His comments to me, a beautiful aircraft to fly, really difficult to handle on the ground. Ground steering is by differential braking, differential thrust, because rudder doesn’t help when there is no tail wheel steering (a little bit of magic in the Cub and a few other small taildraggers) and no air flow over the rudder.

    There was a time, when most aircraft were taildraggers, ground handling for the type, in various sizes, was part of pilot training. Aircraft move to tricycle gear because it made ground handling easier, and passengers didn’t need to climb uphill to their seats.

    I’ve seen a neat trick with small taildraggers, Cubs and Champs. When parked tightly with little room to maneuver, a pilot could stir up enough prop wash to raise the tail with nose down elevator, standing on the brakes, then release one brake to pivot on the other wheel. Rudder helps. I suspect this might work with a number of small aircraft with enough control authority to be aerobatic. I’ve seen it done only on turf.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Manchester UK
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    Or start on the runway.

    Col.

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