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FSX on 32" monitor.


alexzar14

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Anyone tried one of these? How is it?

The Acer B326HUL is going down in cost. I am looking at it as an interesting alternative to 3x smaller monitor set up which gives you the peripheral view yet still too small to fly planes with very small fonts on the instrument displays.

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Hm, never thought about it. They are cheap indeed (very cheap if you think about the cost of a 40" PC monitor). I heard TVs don't have the display quality of PC monitors, true? Other issues are electrical draw and operation: can it be turned on/off by computer like the PC monitors or you have to do it manually? How do these work with computers?
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I have a Samsung 32" smart TV connected via HDMI and it has great resolution. The good thing is I can put up TV when I'm not flying or working on my PC. I will never go back to a dedicated monitor.
*** Stay Thursday, my friend. ***
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As far as the display quality, it seems fine to me. Actually better than fine. Many adjustments can be made to color, sharpness, etc. Also there are trade offs between the TV and the video card, NVidia 970 for me. It seems to me that, once again size matters. I went from a 21" CRT monitor to a 28inch HDTV, then to my present 40 inch HDTV. Never would go back.

 

Dunno about the electrical draw. You can probably chase that down on the web if it is important to you.

 

I turn it on/off with the remote after I shut down the computer. I've always shut down my monitor separately. Didn't know I could shut it down from the PC. I wonder how that works?

 

It connects to the desktop via HMDI cable, and it is necessary to have a top notch gold connector cable for top performance of the TV.

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A little tale for sitting around the campfire- I bought a big heavy 28" HannsG monitor about 4 years ago from the local computer shop for 268 GB pounds (424 US dollars) for simming and gaming but after about 18 months it broke down, and to my shock horror the shop (and other shops) said "sorry we don't repair monitors"

I suppose I could have crated it up and shipped it off to a HannsG repair depot somewhere, but I couldn't be bothered, especially as people were telling me in PC Help forums that "once they begin breaking down it's only a matter of time before the next component fails, and the next, and the next, so it's best to write it off and dump it, and go buy a new monitor."

So I took their advice and dumped it and bought a smaller cheaper lighter 24" mon.

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Hm, never thought about it. They are cheap indeed (very cheap if you think about the cost of a 40" PC monitor). I heard TVs don't have the display quality of PC monitors, true? Other issues are electrical draw and operation: can it be turned on/off by computer like the PC monitors or you have to do it manually? How do these work with computers?

 

I just picked up 2 40" led tv's and with mine, if you run a dvi or d-sub cable and put the tv in pc mode, the picture is much better than with a straight hdmi cable. Doing it this way also allows the tv's to be turned off just like a display.

 

While the picture is not as crisp as my previous monitors (2x dell 24" at 1920x1200), the immersion factor more than justifies the change. I plan to add one or even 2 more 40" tv's to run in span and portrait modes for a full 180 POV.

Regards, Kendall
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Thank you, I am a bit skeptical though... but then if I buy a very wide one (with a height equivalent of a 32" at least), it would grab a wider view... interesting idea, I'm just a bit afraid a TV will be a pain to use for other purposes like work and web browsing. I'm sure 5-7 years from now there will be ultrawide 40"+ dedicated monitors, untill then... not sure, gotta think: an ultrawide TV or a dedicated ACER 32" monitor.

 

 

@ScatterbrainKid

I believe you risk little buying the monitors these days, there are some nice ones out there. I did a research and found the most popular 27 incher to be an ASUS PB278Q for about $450-500. Got it, beautiful monitor (I think a newer model just came out), but may be the sim needs something else... Problem is it costs too much to experiment -))))

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Look into a Seiki 39 inch Monitor. 3840x2160 UHD. Beautiful Picture. Also purchased another program called "Display Fusion". With this program you can divide screen into separate monitors and with one click go to full screen. I have a picture of it in the gallery,"Seiki".

GPU: GeForce GTX 1080

CPU: Intel Core i7-7700K CPU@4.2GHz

Memory: 16.00GB Ram

Resolution: 3840 x 2160, 30Hz Seiki 39†Monitor

Operating System: Windows 10 Home Edition

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Thank you, I am a bit skeptical though... but then if I buy a very wide one (with a height equivalent of a 32" at least), it would grab a wider view

 

To state the obvious, assuming you went like-for-like on the size there is no comparison between a TV and the monitor you are looking at. The resolution of the monitor is 2560 x 1440, the TV's most likely a paltry 1920 x 1080. This will have a big effect on how nice it will look for FSX. And if you go for a bigger TV you just compound the problem, stretching out the same pixels you have on your generic 22" LCD over a much bigger area.

MarkH

 

C0TtlQd.jpg

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To state the obvious, assuming you went like-for-like on the size there is no comparison between a TV and the monitor you are looking at. The resolution of the monitor is 2560 x 1440, the TV's most likely a paltry 1920 x 1080. This will have a big effect on how nice it will look for FSX. And if you go for a bigger TV you just compound the problem, stretching out the same pixels you have on your generic 22" LCD over a much bigger area.

 

At the end of the day, we pay our money and take our choice. No need for emotion. Just a question of rather immersion is more important than what???

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To state the obvious, assuming you went like-for-like on the size there is no comparison between a TV and the monitor you are looking at. The resolution of the monitor is 2560 x 1440, the TV's most likely a paltry 1920 x 1080. This will have a big effect on how nice it will look for FSX. And if you go for a bigger TV you just compound the problem, stretching out the same pixels you have on your generic 22" LCD over a much bigger area.

 

Thank you, this is a good feedback too.

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OOOOH BOY, I THINK I GOT IN LOVE WITH THIS ONE!! ->

 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16824236467&cm_re=asus_32-_-24-236-467-_-Product

 

 

What do you think? Not just with FSX in mind, this monitor is a pretty thing to have and I like pretty things.

My only concern is that it is 4K and someone on utube (a reviewer) said 4Ks are not for gaming, I din't really understand... please explain.

Strangely, this 4K monitor costs much less then a non-4K 32 incher by ACER.

Is it good?

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My only concern is that it is 4K and someone on utube (a reviewer) said 4Ks are not for gaming, I din't really understand... please explain.

 

Could be related to the refresh rate limits on HDMI 1.4 ports. Due to the larger amount of data that needs to be sent to the monitor, the max refresh rate is limited to 30 Hz. For 60 Hz refresh rates, HDMI 2.0 or DisplayPort 1.2 connections are required. Many gamers also prefer monitors with 120 or 144 Hz refresh rates, and more recently, models with G-Sync or FreeSync support.

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Could be related to the refresh rate limits on HDMI 1.4 ports. Due to the larger amount of data that needs to be sent to the monitor, the max refresh rate is limited to 30 Hz. For 60 Hz refresh rates, HDMI 2.0 or DisplayPort 1.2 connections are required. Many gamers also prefer monitors with 120 or 144 Hz refresh rates, and more recently, models with G-Sync or FreeSync support.

 

 

The lady in the vid says it has HDMI 2.0 connection...

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Does your video card though? Not all do. And even then it would still only support 60 Hz refresh rates. Many gamers prefer 120/144 Hz monitors for gaming. Not a big issue though if you aren't getting more than 60 FPS in the sim.

 

One more point to note is that this is what is called a wide gamut monitor, meaning it supports a much larger range of colours. While great for Photoshop and other programs that know how to make use of the wide range, other programs don't always do very well. It is a nice looking monitor, but definitely aimed more at professional graphics users than gamers or simmers.

 

For something more in the gaming category, Asus has other models. And here is one from Acer.

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Does your video card though? Not all do. And even then it would still only support 60 Hz refresh rates. Many gamers prefer 120/144 Hz monitors for gaming. Not a big issue though if you aren't getting more than 60 FPS in the sim.

 

My card is EVGA GTX-970, does it comply? My fps rate locked at 30.

 

 

 

One more point to note is that this is what is called a wide gamut monitor, meaning it supports a much larger range of colours. While great for Photoshop and other programs that know how to make use of the wide range, other programs don't always do very well. It is a nice looking monitor, but definitely aimed more at professional graphics users than gamers or simmers.

 

For something more in the gaming category, Asus has other models. And here is one from Acer.

 

Yes, I figured 4K is for color work. The reason I consider this Asus monitor is the 32" size, not the fact it is 4K. Ironically it costs less than a non-4K 32" Acer B326HUL by nearly $100 (possibly temporarily). Had Asus do a non-4K 32" monitor I'd be ok with it.

My really concern is that it wouldn't be worst in display quality than my present Asus PB278Q, I don't expect it to be better just hope it won't be worst.

 

As for the gaming Acer monitor, it's waaay expensive for the size )))) Few years from now we are likely to see 40 ultrawides (?), until then I need something big like 32", not too many to choose from.

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Yes, the GeForce GTX 970s support HDMI 2.0.

 

Just noticed that the Newegg link you posted and the YouTube video are for different models. The Asus PA328Q in the video is a 4K monitor, while the Asus PB328Q in the Newegg link is not. Both are still wide gamut monitors though, so read up on them to see if they can emulate a more conventional colour space. Games can appear over saturated on wide gamut monitors.

 

As for the cost of the Acer, it's the combination of an IPS panel and high refresh rates with G-Sync support that drive the price up. Traditionally one had to choose between colour accuracy and viewing angles with IPS panels, or high refresh rates and fast response times from TN panels. Gaming tended to favour the latter, however that may now be changing.

 

Yes, I figured 4K is for color work.

 

The resolution and colour support are separate features. Higher resolutions are great for graphics work, but plenty of lower resolution monitors support the same wide colour range too.

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Good news it wasn't 4K but I found another option I like, returning to where I started - ultrawides (learning only when it comes to it): LG 34UM64. Ultrawides is what FSim needs, a solid understanding. Going LG and hope Asus will not release its own $600-700 ultrawide next month, I really lke Asuses with their height/pivot bases, will be upset if they do.
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Something I miss in this discussion is display lag. By and large TV screens are just too slow to support things like TrackIR head movements (results in smearing effects). I just went from fairly old 3 screen Samsung/Eizo to three cheap but very fast (1ms) Asus 24" - this will do for the time being. Setting the three screens slightly behind each other so the bezel gets halved gives a nice fake 3D effect too. Together with TrackIR the immersion is very enjoyable.
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Something I miss in this discussion is lag or refresh rate. By and large TV screens are just too slow to support things like TrackIR head movements (results in smearing effects). I just went from fairly old 3 screen Samsung/Eizo to three cheap but very fast (1ms) Asus 24" - this will do for the time being. Setting the three screens slightly behind each other so the bezel gets halved gives a nice fake 3D effect too. Together with TrackIR the immersion is very enjoyable.

 

My 40 inch Vizio I advertised at 120 hz. Whether it is or not it seems plenty fast enough for looking around my vcs or scanning the landscape. I don't use TrackIR after buying it but I zoom around vcs with my hat switch and zoom, never see any evidence of lag.

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My 40 inch Vizio I advertised at 120 hz. Whether it is or not it seems plenty fast enough for looking around my vcs or scanning the landscape. I don't use TrackIR after buying it but I zoom around vcs with my hat switch and zoom, never see any evidence of lag.

 

Hi, not really what I meant. The lag is the time the pixels need to switch, to recycle from full dark to full light. Most panel producers advertise this in miliseconds. Everything above 4 ms IMO is too slow for gaming, because of the smearing. It is quite hard to get hold of this information for TVs (there are websites dedicated to this) but every computer monitor has it written in its description. With the resolution I am running, the 1ms Asus panels work just fine, whereas the > 4ms Eizo and Samsungs showed noticable black smearing. I guess a lot of people just aren't aware of this, as so many are happily playing with PS/XBox on TVs - until they see the difference side by side.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_lag

 

http://www.displaylag.com/display-database/

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this is what it looks like on a 34" LG. Pretty an improvement although misses few inches in height. An ideal FS monitor would be that of a length equivalent of a 34" ultrawide and a height equivalent of a 32" standard.

 

(ps. neverming my plaps being up past retraction point, missed it looking left and right over my new monitor...)

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