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A neat trick for those who have O&O Defrag


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Here's a neat little trick I stumbled across the other day, but unfortunately I don't recall where I saw it, so I apologize in advance for not being able to give proper credit.

 

The trick is aimed at those who have the O&O Defrag application. I do not know if this also works with other defraggers, but the instructions are specific to O&O.

 

What you do when you defrag is to run the SPACE option twice in a row, followed by a COMPLETE/NAME.

 

I was used to running first a STEALTH, then a SPACE and finally a COMPLETE/NAME. So I saw this trick mentioned, as the next time the turn came to defrag my F: drive (my main FSX drive), I thought why not try it. So I ran a STEALTH, then SPACE twice, and finally a COMPLETE/NAME. And guess what - from I hit "Fly Now" until I'm sitting in my airplane the time has decreased dramatically, I'd say off the top of my head decreased abotu 70%!!!! And that even with my relatively slow 5400 rpm hard drives.

 

Again sorry for not being able to send camels loaded with apes, peacocks and jewellery to the door of the author of this trick.

 

Jorgen

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Just a fyi..... I use Stealth only for regular(fast) defrag.... Space every couple of months(longer defrag)..... and I NEVER use Complete Name, for one reason..... The one time I ran it it hosed my FSX and took me days to fix it.... your mileage may vary.
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I've been using this method for years, never a problem. I believe I got it from one of nickn posts at simforums.

Bruce

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]I5-2500k@ 4.5Ghz/ 16 GB Gskill DDR3 1600/Nvidia GTX460 1GB// CH Yoke/Pedals/Throttle/TrackIR/Win7/ Fsx Deluxe SP1 & SP2

 

"Don't let fear or good judgment hold you back"

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New computer has 2 Solid State Drives. Even though I own O&O, I will probably never use it again, and never need a defrag program. According to all sources, there is never a need to defrag a solid state drive.

I loved O&O when I had my older computer though, and I always used COMPLETE/NAME. Worked great.

 

Stan

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As I understand it, you don't gain anything by defragging a SSD - on the other hand, you actually wear it out over time. Again, as I understand it, the "gates" in the SSD have a limited life and will only change state so many times before quitting. I may of course be off my rocker....

 

Jorgen

 

 

Your rocker is OK. The thing that eventually causes the SSD to fail is the number of write operations. So.....never defrag the SSD.....(it won't help anyway).....

 

Doug

Intel 10700K @ 5.0 Ghz, Asus Maxumus XII Hero MB, Noctua NH-U12A Cooler, Corsair Vengence Pro 32GB 3200Mhz, Geforce RTX 2060 Super GPU, Cooler Master HAF 932 Tower, Thermaltake 1000W Toughpower PSU, Windows 10 Professional 64-Bit, and other good stuff.
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Well, sometimes I fear my rocker could be broken from jumping out of otherwise perfectly OK airplanes 178 times. A retired USMC Colonel actually suggested once, tongue in cheek, that for doing that I could not be perfectly sane, and my reply was that if he went up to the front office and took a look at the characters driving the thing he himself would want to jump... and he agreed!

 

Jorgen

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It is true that SSDs will wear out over time, but then again, so do the mechanical parts in a hard drive. As SSDs work very differently than a hard drive, the same defragging doesn't help. TRIM support is more important for maintaining performance, which is natively supported by Windows 7 and later.

 

For those worried about their SSD wearing out, relax, most will last quite some time. And the better quality models will last a very long time.

 

http://techreport.com/review/27062/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-only-two-remain-after-1-5pb

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Probably the warranty, though this number will be based on the expected lifespan of the drives. Most of us aren't writing nearly enough data to cause a SSD to fail in under 3 years (maybe for one of the earliest models), and probably even out to 5 years. In the article I linked above a Samsung 840 Pro has survived writing 1.2 PB (Petabytes; or 1,048,576 GB) of data. Other models died after writing several hundred TBs of data, which are still very impressive amounts.
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