Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: The Mighty B-52 From Ellsworth, To Tinker AFB - A MIGHTY Post - History Lesson Too!

  1. #1

    Default The Mighty B-52 From Ellsworth, To Tinker AFB - A MIGHTY Post - History Lesson Too!

    The Mighty B-52 BUFF (Bug Ugly Fat Fellow)
    Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota to Tinker, AFB Oklahoma)

    A Mighty Aircraft and a Mighty Post! Get Comfy!


    Hey everyone! This is my first B-52 complete flight! This is the LARGEST aircraft I’ve flown yet in FSX – but before we continue, first of all I have the technical aspects of the flight for you.

    Aircraft: Boeing B-52 Stratofortress Exterior by Captain Sim
    Departure: KRCA Ellsworth, AFB – South Dakota
    Desitnation: KTIK Tinker, AFB - Okalahoma
    Weather: Real world, real time Courtesy of REX

    The flight plan in Google Earth’s Flight Sim Commander interface:


    Did you know that Ellsworth, is located near Rapid City, South Dakota? Did you know that Rapid City is the second-largest city in the U.S. state of South Dakota, and the county seat of Pennington County. Named after Rapid Creek on which the city is established, it is set against the eastern slope of the Black Hills mountain range. Rapid City had an estimated population of 67,107 as of the July 2009 US Census Estimates. Rapid City is known as the "Gateway to the Black Hills" and the "Star of the West". The city is divided by a mountain range that splits the western and eastern parts of the city into two.

    On the ramp at Ellsworth AFB – that is in Box Elder, South Dakota


    The public discovery of gold in 1874 by the Custer Expedition brought a mass influx of settlers into the Black Hills region of South Dakota. Rapid City was founded (and originally known as "Hay Camp") in 1876 by a group of disappointed miners, who promoted their new city as the "Gateway to the Black Hills." John Brennan and Samuel Scott, with a small group of men, laid out the site of the present Rapid City in February 1876, which was named for the spring-fed Rapid Creek that flows through it. A square mile was measured off and the six blocks in the center were designated as a business section. Committees were appointed to bring in prospective merchants and their families to locate in the new settlement. The city soon began selling supplies to miners and pioneers. Its location on the edge of the Plains and Hills and its large river valley made it the natural hub of railroads arriving in the late 1880s from both the south and east. By 1900, Rapid City had survived a boom and bust and was establishing itself as an important regional trade center for the upper midwest.

    Taxiing Out – sorry about scraping that smaller strut in the ground – Woops!


    Although the Black Hills became a popular tourist destination in the late 1890s, it was a combination of local boosterism, the popularity of the automobile, and construction of improved highways that brought tourists to the Black Hills in large numbers after World War I. Gutzon Borglum, already a famous sculptor, began work on Mount Rushmore in 1927 and his son, Lincoln Borglum, continued the carving of the presidents' faces in rock following his father's death in 1941. The work was halted due to pressures leading to the US entry into World War II and the massive sculpture was declared complete in 1941. Although tourism sustained the city throughout the Great Depression of the 1930s, the gas rationing of World War II had a devastating effect on the tourist industry in the town, but this was more than made up for by the war-related growth.
    The city benefited greatly from the opening of Rapid City Army Air Base, later Ellsworth Air Force Base, an Army Air Corps training base. As a result, the population of the area nearly doubled between 1940 and 1948, from almost 14,000 to nearly 27,000 people. Military families and civilian personnel soon took every available living space in town, and mobile parks proliferated. Rapid City businesses profited from the military payroll. During the Cold War, missile installations proliferated in the area: a series of Nike Air Defense sites were constructed around Ellsworth in the 1950s. In the early 60s the construction of three Titan (rocket family) missile launch sites containing a total of nine Titan I missiles in the general vicinity of Rapid City took place. Beginning in November 1963, the land for a hundred miles east, northeast and northwest of the city was dotted with 150 Minuteman missile silos and 15 launch command centers, all of which were deactivated in the early 1990s.
    In 1949, city officials envisioned the city as a retail and wholesale trade center for the region and designed a plan for growth that focused on a civic center, more downtown parking places, new schools, and paved streets. A construction boom continued into the 1950s. Growth slowed in the 1960s, but the worst natural disaster in South Dakota history, the Black Hills Flood led to another building boom a decade later. On June 9, 1972, heavy rains caused massive flooding of the Rapid Creek. More than 250 people lost their lives and more than $100 million in property was destroyed.

    Holding short


    The devastation of the flood and the outpouring of private donations and millions of dollars in federal aid led to the completion of one big part of the 1949 plan: clearing the area along the Rapid Creek and making it a public park. New homes and businesses were constructed to replace those that had been destroyed. Rushmore Plaza Civic Center and a new Central High School were built in part of the area that had been cleared. The new Central High School opened in 1978, with the graduating class in that year straddling both the original Central (housed in what is now Dakota Middle School) and the new Central. The rebuilding in part insulated Rapid City from the drop in automotive tourism caused by the Oil Embargo in 1974, but tourism was depressed for most of a decade. In 1978, Rushmore Mall was built on the north edge of the city, adding to the city's position as a retail shopping center.
    In 1980 in United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the government of the United States had illegally stolen the Black Hills from the Sioux people when the government unilaterally broke the treaty that guaranteed the Black Hills belonged to the Sioux. The court decision offered money, but the Sioux declined on principle that the theft of their land should not be validated, and still demand the return of the land. This land includes Rapid City, which is by far the largest modern settlement in the Black Hills. As of 2010, the dispute has not been settled.
    In the 1980s, growth was fueled by an increase in tourism, increasingly tied to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, followed by another decline in the late 1990s. Fears for the closure of Ellsworth AFB as part of the massive base closure process in the 1990s and 2000s led to attempts to expand other sectors of the economy, but growth continued and the city expanded significantly during this period.
    Today, Rapid City is South Dakota's primary city for tourism and recreation. With the approval of a Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at the Homestake Mine site, Rapid City has a future of great advancements in technology, medicine, and scientific research



    Take Off, gear up


    On June 9–10, 1972, extremely heavy rains over the eastern Black Hills of South Dakota produced record floods on Rapid Creek and other streams in the area. Nearly 15 inches (380 mm) of rain fell in about 6 hours near Nemo, and more than 10 inches (250 mm) of rain fell over an area of 60 square miles (160 km2). According to the Red Cross, the resulting peak floods (which occurred after dark) left 238 people dead and 3,057 people injured. In addition to the human tragedy, total damage was estimated in excess of $160 million (about $821 million in 2009 dollars), which included 1,335 homes and 5,000 automobiles that were destroyed. Runoff from this storm produced record floods (highest peak flows recorded) along Battle, Spring, Rapid, and Box Elder Creeks. Smaller floods also occurred along Elk Creek and Bear Butte Creek. Canyon Lake Dam, on the west side of Rapid City, broke the night of the flood, unleashing a wall of water down the creek. The 1972's flooding has an estimated recurrence interval of 500 years.(Burr and Korkow, 1996), which means that a flood of this magnitude will occur on average once every 500 years. Every year there is a 0.2 percent chance (1 in 500) of experiencing a similar event. To prevent a similar tragedy from occurring in the future, the city's flood plain is no longer allowed to be built upon. Today the flood plain features golf courses, parks, sports arenas, and arboretums where neighborhoods and businesses once stood.

    Turning to climb to cruise and intercept the flight path


    In 2007, the Rapid City Public Library created a 1972 Flood digital archive that collects survivors' stories, photos and news accounts of the flood. The Journey Museum has an interactive display on the 1972 flood which is an on going project to give future generations the best idea of how the people were affected and the changes made to it because of the loss of 238 lives. It will in the future include the biographies of all of those who died so they will be remembered as more than names on a memorial

    Threatening clouds over head even dwarf a mighty aircraft like the B-52


    Climbing above REX’s beautiful clouds


    More in Reply ====================
    Last edited by Ragtopjohnny; 02-26-2011 at 02:09 PM.


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  2. #2

    Default

    Still climbing out, land peaks through the clouds from time to time


    The 8 engines swiftly move this mighty beast above the clouds


    Still climbing to 38,000ft


    Off to the left we see Badlands National Park


    Did you know that Badlands National Park, in southwest South Dakota, United States preserves 244,000 acres (98,740 ha) of sharply eroded buttes, pinnacles, and spires blended with the largest protected mixed grass prairie in the United States.
    The Badlands Wilderness protects 64,144 acres (25,958 ha) of the park as a designated wilderness area and is the site of the reintroduction of the black-footed ferret, the most endangered land mammal in North America.
    The Stronghold Unit is co-managed with the Oglala Lakota tribe and includes sites of 1890s Ghost Dances, a former United States Air Force bomb and gunnery range, and Red Shirt Table, the park's highest point at 3,340 feet (1,020 m). Authorized as Badlands National Monument on March 4, 1929, it was not established until January 25, 1939. Under the Mission 66 plan, the Ben Reifel Visitor Center was constructed for the monument in 1957-58.
    It was redesignated a national park on November 10, 1978. The park also administers the nearby Minuteman Missile National Historic Site.

    Wind Cave National Park to the right of the aircraft, Butcher Hill, Potato Butte, and Brennan Hill in the distance


    For 11,000 years, Native Americans have used this area for their hunting grounds. Long before the Lakota were the little-studied paleo-Indians, followed by the Arikara people. Their descendants live today in North Dakota as a part of the Three Affiliated Tribes. Archaeological records combined with oral traditions indicate that these people camped in secluded valleys where fresh water and game were available year round. Eroding out of the stream banks today are the rocks and charcoal of their campfires, as well as the arrowheads and tools they used to butcher bison, rabbits, and other game. From the top of the Badlands Wall, they could scan the area for enemies and wandering herds. If hunting was good, they might hang on into winter, before retracing their way to their villages along the Missouri River. By one hundred and fifty years ago, the Great Sioux Nation consisting of seven bands including the Oglala Lakota, had displaced the other tribes from the northern prairie.
    The next great change came toward the end of the 19th century as homesteaders moved into South Dakota. The U.S. government stripped Native Americans of much of their territory and forced them to live on reservations. In the fall and early winter of 1890, thousands of Native American followers, including many Oglala Sioux, became followers of the Indian prophet Wovoka. His vision called for the native people to dance the Ghost Dance and wear Ghost Shirts, which would be impervious to bullets. Wovoka had predicted that the white man would vanish and their hunting grounds would be restored. One of the last known Ghost Dances was conducted on Stronghold Table in the South Unit of Badlands National Park. As winter closed in, the ghost dancers returned to Pine Ridge Agency. The climax of the struggle came in late December, 1890. Headed south from the Cheyenne River, a band of Minneconjou Sioux crossed a pass in the Badlands Wall. Pursued by units of the U.S. Army, they were seeking refuge in the Pine Ridge Reservation. The band, led by Chief Big Foot, was finally overtaken by the soldiers near Wounded Knee Creek in the Reservation and ordered to camp there overnight. The troops attempted to disarm Big Foot's band the next morning. Gunfire erupted. Before it was over, nearly three hundred Indians and thirty soldiers lay dead. The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major clash between Plains Indians and the U.S. military until the advent of the American Indian Movement in the 1970s, most notably in the 1973 standoff at Wounded Knee, South Dakota.
    Wounded Knee is not within the boundaries of Badlands National Park. It is located approximately 45 miles (72 km) south of the park on Pine Ridge Reservation. The U.S. government and the Oglala Lakota Nation have agreed that this is a story to be told by the Oglala of Pine Ridge and Minneconjou of Standing Rock Reservation. The interpretation of the site and its tragic events are held as the primary responsibility of these survivors.

    Little Squaw Humper Table in view along with Red Shirt Table and Sqaw Humper Table.


    The history of the White River Badlands as a significant paleontological resource goes back to the traditional Native American knowledge of the area. The Lakota found large fossilized bones, fossilized seashells and turtle shells. They correctly assumed that the area had once been under water, and that the bones belonged to creatures which no longer existed. Paleontological interest in this area began in the 1840s. Trappers and traders regularly traveled the 300 miles (480 km) from Fort Pierre to Fort Laramie along a path which skirted the edge of what is now Badlands National Park. Fossils were occasionally collected, and in 1843 a fossilized jaw fragment collected by Alexander Culbertson of the American Fur Company found its way to a physician in St. Louis by the name of Dr. Hiram A. Prout.
    In 1846, Prout published a paper about the jaw in the American Journal of Science in which he stated that it had come from a creature he called a Paleotherium. Shortly after the publication, the White River Badlands became popular fossil hunting grounds and, within a couple of decades, numerous new fossil species had been discovered in the White River Badlands. In 1849, Dr. Joseph Leidy, published a paper on an Oligocene camel and renamed Prout's Paleotherium, Titanotherium prouti. By 1854 when he published a series of papers about North American fossils, 84 distinct species had been discovered in North America - 77 of which were found in the White River Badlands. In 1870 a Yale professor, O. C. Marsh, visited the region and developed more refined methods of extracting and reassembling fossils into nearly complete skeletons. From 1899 to today, the South Dakota School of Mines has sent people almost every year and remains one of the most active research institutions working in the White River Badlands. Throughout the late 19th century and continuing today, scientists and institutions from all over the world have benefited from the fossil resources of the White River Badlands. The White River Badlands have developed an international reputation as a fossil-rich area. They contain the richest deposits of Oligocene mammals known, providing a brief glimpse of life in this area 33 million years ago.
    A broader view of Badlands National Park


    Aspects of American homesteading began before the end of the American Civil War; however, homesteading didn't really impact the Badlands until well into the 20th century. Many hopeful farmers travelled to South Dakota from Europe or the East Coast to try to eke out a living in this hard place. The standard size for a homestead was 160 acres (65 ha). This proved far too small to support a family in a semi-arid, wind-swept environment. In the western Dakotas, the size of a homestead was increased to 640 acres (260 ha). Cattle grazed and crops like winter wheat and hay were cut annually. However, the Great Dust Bowl events of the 1930s combined with waves of grasshoppers proved too much for most of the hardy souls of the Badlands. Houses built out of sod blocks and heated by buffalo chips were soon abandoned. Those who remained are still here today - ranching and raising wheat.

    Pine Ridge below us, with RT 407 going through town


    Did you know that Pine Ridge had As of the census of 2000, there were 3,171 people, 688 households, and 593 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 1,035.4 people per square mile (400.1/km˛). There were 742 housing units at an average density of 242.3/sq mi (93.6/km˛). The racial makeup of the CDP was 94.20% Native American, 3.72% White, 0.09% African American, 0.03% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.80% of the population.
    There were 688 households out of which 53.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.1% were married couples living together, 40.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 13.8% were non-families. 10.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.40 and the average family size was 4.63.
    In the CDP the population was spread out with 46.9% under the age of 18, 11.0% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 12.4% from 45 to 64, and 3.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 20 years. For every 100 females there were 100.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.
    The median income for a household in the CDP was $21,089, and the median income for a family was $20,170. Males had a median income of $26,875 versus $25,516 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $6,067. About 49.2% of families and 61.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 74.6% of those under age 18 and 18.8% of those age 65 or over.

    Passing Gordon, Nebraska


    Did you know As of the census of 2000, there were 1,756 people, 733 households, and 467 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,881.0 people per square mile (729.0/km˛). There were 825 housing units at an average density of 883.7/sq mi (342.5/km˛). The racial makeup of the city was 82.35% White, 15.43% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 1.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.65% of the population.
    There were 733 households out of which 29.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.2% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.2% were non-families. 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.97.
    In the city the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 23.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 84.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.3 males.
    The median income for a household in the city was $27,896, and the median income for a family was $35,139. Males had a median income of $27,656 versus $16,927 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,105. About 13.4% of families and 15.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.5% of those under age 18 and 8.0% of those age 65 or over.

    Approaching Sumuel McKelvie National Forest, and the North Platte River below us.


    Did you know that the following folks came from Gordon?
    • Val Fitch, 1980 winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics.
    • Dwight Griswold, governor of Nebraska from 1940 to 1946 and editor and publisher of the Gordon Journal from 1922 to 1940.
    • Trevor Johnson, NFL player with the Kansas City Chiefs
    • Doc Middleton, an outlaw in the late 1800s

    More in Reply =================================


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  3. #3

    Default

    Another view of the North Platte River


    Did you know that Keystone is an unincorporated community in central Keith County, Nebraska, United States. It lies along local roads near the North Platte River, northeast of the city of Ogallala, the county seat of Keith County. Its elevation is 3,100 feet (945 m). Although Keystone is unincorporated, it has a post office, with the ZIP code of 69144

    A view towards Keystone and Lake McConaughy in the distance


    Did you know North Platte is a city in and the county seat of Lincoln County, Nebraska, United States. It is located in the southwestern part of the state, along Interstate 80, at the confluence of the North and South Platte Rivers forming the Platte River. The population was 23,878 at the 2000 census.
    North Platte is a railroad town; Union Pacific Railroad's large Bailey Yard is located within the city. Today, North Platte is served only by freight trains, but during World War II the city was famous for the North Platte Canteen. Tens of thousands of volunteers from North Platte and surrounding towns met the troop trains passing through North Platte, offering coffee, sandwiches and hospitality.
    North Platte is the principal city of the North Platte Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Lincoln, Logan, and McPherson counties.

    North Platte below us you can see Bailey Rail Yard clearly in the screen shot


    North Platte is home to the world's largest railyard, Bailey Yard. The Golden Spike Tower and Visitor Center is an eight story building which overlooks the expansive railroad staging area. The tower and visitor center are open to the public year-round.
    Lincoln County Historical Museum contains a display detailing the history of the North Platte Canteen, which greeted 6.5 million service personnel from Christmas Day 1941 through April 1, 1946. It also contains a Prairie Village with local landmark homes and other buildings, including a Pony Express station and pioneer church among many others
    Buffalo Bill Ranch State Historical Park is located near North Platte, a Nebraska living history park about Buffalo Bill Cody. The park includes his actual house known as Scout's Rest Ranch. The park is two miles west of U.S. Highway 83 along U.S. Highway 30.
    During the 1930s, high crime rates and corruption caused North Platte to be infamously known as 'Little Chicago,' as depicted in the novel Evil Obsession written by award-winning author Nellie Snyder Yost.
    North Platte is also home of the State of Nebraska official celebration known as "Nebraskaland Days" which occurs every year in June. This draws over 100,000 visitors per event to enjoy, for example, rodeos, concerts, western art and parades
    Two deputies investigated the sighting of unidentified flying objects in the sky south of Brady Nov. 21, 2008 according to Lincoln County Sheriff Jerome Kramer. Although both deputies and the man who called to report the lights dancing in the sky observed them for more than 15 minutes, they could offer no explanation about what they were

    Look out – coming at yah!


    Notable natives and residents
    • Howard Baskerville
    • Mobster Henry Hill used to work as a cook in North Platte.
    • The popular big band leader Glenn Miller lived in North Platte during his childhood and started his musical career there when his father bought him a mandolin.
    • Noted San Francisco Bay Area Disc Jockey Dr. Don Rose, was born and raised in North Platte and would frequently reference the city on his popular morning show.
    • Ryan "The Lion" Schultz Mixed Martial Artist, IFL Lightweight Champion
    • Nebraska Senator Chuck Hagel was born in North Platte.
    • Danny Woodhead played high school football at North Platte High School. Woodhead went on to play college football at Chadron State College. He set numerous records including the all-time rushing mark for any NCAA division level. He also won NCAA Football- Division II's most prestigious award twice, the Harlon Hill Trophy, in both 2006 and 2007. He is now a running back/wide receiver for the New England Patriots of the National Football League.
    • Chief Red Cloud, Sioux warrior, was born near North Platte in 1822.
    • Former PBR bull rider Mark Ward, 4-time qualifier to the PBR World Finals (1999–2001, 2004), currently a stock contractor.
    • PBR/PRCA bull rider Dustin Elliott, 2-time PBR World Finals qualifier (2007–08), and 2004 PRCA World Champion bull rider.
    A wonderful nose job on this aircraft


    Cambridge, Nebraska


    As of the census of 2000, there were 1,041 people, 486 households, and 282 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,287.3 people per square mile (496.2/km˛). There were 545 housing units at an average density of 674.0/sq mi (259.8/km˛). The racial makeup of the city was 98.75% White, 0.29% Native American, 0.10% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 0.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.77% of the population.
    There were 486 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.8% were non-families. 39.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 28.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.88.
    In the city the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 22.1% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 25.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 85.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.2 males.
    The median income for a household in the city was $30,913, and the median income for a family was $37,500. Males had a median income of $28,214 versus $20,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,673. About 4.5% of families and 7.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.9% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over.

    A view of Norton, Kansas, and the Norton Wildlife Area and Norton Dam


    The B-52 in the sun


    Approaching Damar


    More in Reply ==============================


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  4. #4

    Default

    Webster State Park and Webster Wildlife Area


    Hill City, Kansas


    Did you know that On June 9, 2005 a large tornado passed 1 mile south of Hill City?

    Clouding up again


    As of the census of 2000, there were 1,604 people, 696 households, and 448 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,716.3 people per square mile (665.9/km2). There were 795 housing units at an average density of 850.7/sq mi (330.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.33% White, 3.43% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.12% of the population.
    There were 696 households out of which 26.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.5% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.80.
    In the city the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 21.6% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 25.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46 years. For every 100 females there were 86.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.6 males.
    The median income for a household in the city was $30,236, and the median income for a family was $36,500. Males had a median income of $26,207 versus $18,295 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,989. About 6.2% of families and 11.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

    Slight course correction over Pilot Knob – trust me – it’s down there somewhere….


    Turning over REX’s wonderful visuals today


    Attica, Kansas


    Did you know Attica is a town in Harper County, Kansas, United States. The population was 636 at the 2000 census. The town is famous for damage caused by an F4 tornado that was featured on an episode of Shockwave on the History Channe

    I just like the detail of the Cimarron River bed below In this one


    As of the census of 2000, there were 636 people, 254 households, and 154 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,097.8 people per square mile (423.4/km˛). There were 297 housing units at an average density of 512.6/sq mi (197.7/km˛). The racial makeup of the city was 98.58% White, 0.94% Native American, 0.16% Asian, 0.16% Pacific Islander, and 0.16% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.63% of the population.
    There were 254 households out of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.8% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.0% were non-families. 37.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 2.82.
    In the city the population was spread out with 19.7% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 19.8% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 31.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 83.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.0 males.
    The median income for a household in the city was $31,012, and the median income for a family was $34,643. Males had a median income of $30,833 versus $20,000 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,733. About 5.8% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.4% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.

    Guthrie, Oklahoma in the distance, and the Cimarron River


    Finally entering our destination state, did you know that Guthrie is a city in and the county seat of Logan County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City Metroplex. The population was 9,925 at the 2000 census.
    Guthrie was the territorial and later the first state capital for Oklahoma. Guthrie is nationally significant because of its outstanding collection of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century commercial architecture. The Guthrie Historic District has been designated a National Historic Landmark.
    Victorian architecture provides a unique backdrop for Wild West and territorial-style entertainment, carriage tours, replica trolley cars, specialty shops, and art galleries. The Masonic Temple is the world's largest conservatory.

    Stillwater, Oklahoma in the distance



    Guthrie originated in 1887 as a railroad station called Deer Creek on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway from the Kansas-Oklahoma border to Purcell. The name was later changed to Guthrie, named for jurist John Guthrie of Topeka, Kansas. A post office was established on April 4, 1889. At noon on April 22, 1889, cannons resounded at a 2-million acre (8,000 km˛) section of Indian Territory, launching president Benjamin Harrison's "Hoss Race" or Land Run of 1889. During the next six hours, about 10,000 people settled in what became the capital of the new Territory of Oklahoma. Within months, Guthrie became a modern brick and stone "Queen of the Prairie" with municipal water, electricity, a mass transit system, and underground parking garages for horses and carriages. Hobart Johnstone Whitley, also known as HJ and the Father of Hollywood, was the first president of the Guthrie Chamber of Commerce. Whitley built the first brick block building in the territory for his National Loan & Trust Company. He was asked by the local people to be the first Governor of Oklahoma. Whitley traveled to Washington, D.C. where he persuaded the U.S. Congress to allow Guthrie to be the new capital of the state of Oklahoma. By 1907, when Guthrie became the capital, it looked like a well established Eastern city.
    Guthrie prospered briefly as the administrative center of the territory, but was eclipsed in economic influence by Oklahoma City early in the 20th century. Oklahoma City had managed to become a major junction for several railroads and had attracted a major industry in the form of meat packing. Oklahoma City business leaders began campaigning soon after statehood to make Oklahoma City the new state capital, and in 1910 a majority of Oklahoma residents voted for the move. In the middle of the night, on June 11, the state seal was removed by the governor and taken to Oklahoma City, and along with it, Guthrie's entire economic base. As a result of the sudden loss of its administrative function, Guthrie began to dwindle in size and soon lost its status as Oklahoma's second largest city, first to Muskogee, then later to Tulsa.
    Guthrie was designated a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 1999.

    More in Reply ======================================


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  5. #5

    Default

    Incredible visuals today


    Our destination air base, Tinker, Tinker Air Force Base (IATA: TIK, ICAO: KTIK, FAA LID: TIK) is a major U.S. Air Force base, with Navy and Department of Defense missions, located in the southeast Oklahoma City area, directly south of the suburb of Midwest City, Oklahoma. The base is named in honor of Oklahoma native Major General Clarence L. Tinker, the first Native American Major General. The base has more than 26,000 military and civilian employees and is the largest single-site employer in the state of Oklahoma. The installation covers approx. 9 square miles (23 km2) and has 760 buildings with a building floor space of over 15,200,000 square feet (1,410,000 m2). The base is bounded by I-40 on the north and I-240 on the south.
    Tinker is the headquarters of the Air Force Materiel Command's (AFMC) Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC), which is the worldwide manager for a wide range of aircraft, engines, missiles, software and avionics and accessories components. The commander of OC-ALC is Major General P. David Gillett, Jr. It is one of three Air Force ALCs, the others being Ogden Air Logistics Center (OO-ALC) at Hill AFB, Utah and Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC) at Robins AFB, Georgia.
    The host unit at Tinker is the 72d Air Base Wing (72 ABW) which provides services and support for the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center and its tenant organizations. The Wing and Installation Commander of Tinker Air Force Base is Colonel Allen Jamerson.
    Tinker is also the home of the Navy's Strategic Communications Wing One (TACAMO), a Navy Air Wing which is fully integrated in the Air Force Base, and employs over 1,300 active-duty sailors and 100 contractors to provide maintenance, security, operations, administration, training and logistic support for the Navy's E-6B Mercury aircraft fleet. The Mercury aircraft enables the President of the United States and the Secretary of Defense to directly contact submarines, bombers and missile silos enforcing the country's national security through nuclear deterrence.
    With the City of Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County owning several square miles of land adjacent to the base, Tinker is one of the few military bases in a major metropolitan area with sufficient room for expansion. Furthermore, Tinker is located in a community that supports expansion; Oklahoma County voters approved a 2008 measure to purchase the former General Motors Oklahoma City Assembly plant (located adjacent to the base) and lease it to Tinker for future expansion. Now known as Building 9001, the former GM plant houses many shops moved from the main maintenance building, 3001

    The Cimarron River stretches great distances


    Major units
    Tinker AFB is home to major Department of Defense, Air Force and Navy activities with critical national defense missions.
    • Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center (OC-ALC)
    OC-ALC is the largest of three ALCs in the Air Force Materiel Command and provides depot maintenance, product support, services and supply chain management, as well as information support for 31 weapon systems, 10 commands, 93 Air Force bases and 46 foreign nations. It is the contracting office for the USAF's Contract Field Teams program.
    • 72d Air Base Wing (72 ABW)
    The diverse, multi-unit, multi-mission wing includes base services and support for the OC-ALC and associate organizations as well as dependents and retirees.
    o 72d Medical Group (MDG)
    o 72d Mission Support Group (MSG)
    • 76th Maintenance Wing (MXW)
    o 76 Aircraft Maintenance Group (AMXG)
    o 76 Propulsion Maintenance Group (PMXG)
    o 76 Commodities Maintenance Group (CMXG)
    o 76 Software Maintenance Group (SMXG)
    o 76 Maintenance Support Group (MXSG)
    • Aerospace Sustainment Directorate (OC-ALC/GK) formally the 327th Aircraft Sustainment Wing
    o 327 ACSG (B-52 & Cruise Missile)
    o 727 ACSG (Contractor Logistics Support)
    o 747 ACSG (Combat Systems)
    o 827 ACSG (C/KC-135)
    Starting descent




    Neighborhoods peaking through the clouds


    The 552d Air Control Wing (ACW, ACC, Tail Code: "OK") flies Air Combat Command's E-3 Sentry AWACS aircraft. The E-3's radar and other sensors provide deep-look surveillance, warning, interception control and airborne battle management. The 552 ACW encompasses 3 groups:
    • 552d Operations Group
    o 960th Airborne Air Control Squadron "Vikings" (E-3)
    o 963d Airborne Air Control Squadron "Blue Knights" (E-3)
    o 964th Airborne Air Control Squadron "Phoenix" (E-3)
    o 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron "Golden Eagles"(E-3)
    o 966th Airborne Air Control Squadron (E-3, Boeing 707)
    o 970th Airborne Air Control Squadron (Reserve)
    o 552d Training Squadron
    • 552d Maintenance Group
    • 552d Air Control Group
    o 752d Operations Support Squadron
    o 552d Air Control Networks Squadron
    o 607th Air Control Squadron
    o 726th Air Control Squadron "Hardrock"
    o 728th Air Control Squadron
    o 729th Air Control Squadron
    View from the front office


    507th Air Refueling Wing
    The 507th Air Refueling Wing (507 ARW) of the Air Force Reserve Command (AFRC) is one of two Air Force Reserve flying units in the state of Oklahoma. The 507 ARW is operationally gaied by Air Mobility Command (AMC), but normally reports to Fourth Air Force (4 AF) and supports AMC's airlift and air refueling requirements.
    The 507th consists of four subordinate groups, 15 squadrons and five flights, employing approximately 1,155 men and women. Approximately 184 members of the 507th are Air Reserve Technicians (ARTs) who serve as a full-time support cadre along with 20 traditional civilian employees. Approximately 350 additional reservists serve with the 931st Air Refueling Group (931 ARG), a subordinate unit of the 507 ARW, that provides direct support to the Air Mobility Command's 22d Air Refueling Wing at McConnell AFB, Kansas.
    The 507 ARW operates twelve KC-135R "Stratotanker" air refueling aircraft at Tinker and works together with the Oklahoma Air National Guard's 137th Air Refueling Wing (137 ARW), also colocated at Tinker. As an associate unit, the 507 ARW also operates the Federal Aviation Administration's FAA's British Aerospace Hawker 125-800 aircraft (ex-USAF C-29A) in the aviation standards and navigational aid inspection mission.


    Last chance for the sun before slipping below the cloud cover


    137th Air Refueling Wing
    The 137th Air Refueling Wing (137 ARW) flies the KC-135R in conjunction with the 507th Air Refueling Wing, having assumed an aerial refueling mission in 2008. The 137 ARW traces its origins to the 137th Fighter Group, founded on 21 November 1946 at Norman, Oklahoma and receiving its Federal recognition on 18 December 1947. In April 1949, a tornado struck the base at Norman. The damage was considered too extensive for economical repair and the decision was made to move the 137th to the present facility at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City. An Air National Guard Station (AGS) was constructed and the move accomplished on 6 September 1949.
    The 137th began as the 185th Fighter Squadron, with the P-51 Mustang. Afterwards, a variety of aircraft have been assigned to the wing, including the F-80 Shooting Star and F-86 Sabrejet. Subsequently renamed as a Troop Carrier Group, Tactical Airlift Group, Airlift Group and Airlift Wing, the 137th later flew the C-97 Stratocruiser, C-124 Globemaster, and C-130 Hercules, having flown the latter from 1974 to 2007. Its previous C-130H models replaced older versions of the Hercules and were received directly from the factory, becoming the first ANG unit to receive brand new aircraft.
    In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to realign Will Rogers AGS by relocating the 137th Airlift Wing (ANG) to Tinker AFB, redesignating it as an air refueling wing and associating it with the Air Force Reserve's 507th Air Refueling Wing while redistributing its C-130H aircraft to other ANG airlift wings.

    More REX and the Mighty B-52 what’s more enjoyable than this?


    STRATCOM Wing ONE (US NAVY)
    Strategic Communications (STRATCOM) Wing ONE is a unique U.S. Navy aviation unit. STRATCOMWING ONE provides a vital, secure communications link designed to be used in the event of nuclear war or other major conflict or incident in order to maintain communications between the decision makers comprising the National Command Authority (NCA) and the triad of US strategic nuclear weapon delivery systems, i.e., manned bombers, land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) and submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs). Also known as the TACAMO mission for "Take Charge and Move Out," STRATCOMWING ONE operates the Navy's E-6 Mercury aircraft in two operational squadrons and one training squadron.
    STRATCOMWING ONE's primary mission is to receive, verify and retransmit Emergency Action Messages (EAMs) to US strategic forces. With the retirement of the USAF EC-135 Looking Glass airframe, E-6 Mercury upgraded with the Airborne Launch Control System (ALCS) have also assumed the airborne command post mission for the United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM). OC-ALC airframe artisans perform depot work on the Navy's E-6 Mercury aircraft, which are based on the Boeing 707 airframe. The wing's Navy sailors perform organizational and field level maintenance work, with the former being integrated at the flying squadron level while the latter is performed at the wing's aircraft intermediate maintenance department (AIMD) level. The wing also operates alert facilities for E-6B aircraft at Travis AFB, California and Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. STRATCOMWING ONE's subordinate squadrons include:
    Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron THREE (VQ-3) (E-6B)
    Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron FOUR (VQ-4) (E-6B)
    Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron SEVEN (VQ-7)

    Descending to cloud level


    Smaller Units
    • The 38th Engineering Installation Group has worldwide responsibility for engineering and installation of all communications and electronic facilities for the Air Force.
    • The 3rd Combat Communications Group (AFSPC), with the motto "Anytime, Anywhere... Hooah", provides deployable communications, computer systems, navigational aids and air traffic control services anywhere in the world.
    The "35th Combat Communications Squadron" is part of the 507th. While a member of the 507th, the 35th is AFSPC gained through the 3rd.
    • Defense Mega Center Oklahoma City is the local branch of the Defense Information Systems Agency. The Mega center operates computer systems for the base and serves 110 other bases in 46 states.
    • Defense Distribution Depot Oklahoma provides the receipt, storage, issue, inspection and shipment of material, including material quality control, preservation and packaging, inventory, transportation functions and pick up and delivery services in support of OC-ALC and other Tinker-based organizations.
    Rain below the clouds



    More in Reply ========================================


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  6. #6

    Default

    The Canadian River below us


    Community support for Tinker can be seen by the establishment of two public/private partnerships that support base operations by using local dollars to make available additional facilities for base use. While these partnerships are technically separate facilities, Tinker's security perimeter is extended around these facilities.
    [edit] Maintenance Repair & Overhaul Technology Center (MROTC)
    The first of the public/private partnerships is The Oklahoma Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul Technology Center (MROTC), managed by Battelle Oklahoma, owned by Oklahoma Industries Authority (OIA), and partners with the Department of Defense to provide a national center for technical solutions to aging commercial and military aircraft. The MROTC is a 370-acre (1.5 km2) world-class MRO facility, on the south east site of Tinker AFB, sharing runways and security with the base. The MROTC complex is planned as a major military and commercial aircraft facility with 17 hangars and more than one million square feet of related industrial space and education and training facilities. The facility currently houses three hangars, one leased by Boeing (designed to accommodiate Boeing 767-400 class aircraft), a second hangar for 767 for lease, and a third hangar designed to accommodate Boeing 707-300 class aircraft

    Everyone should be so fortunate to get a rare glimpse of this bird flying over head…


    Building 9001 (Tinker Aerospace Complex)
    The second of the public/private partnerships is building 9001, originally known as the Tinker Aerospace Complex (sometimes called TAC) housed in the former General Motors Oklahoma City Assembly Plant located west of the runway on the south side of the base, north of I-240. A 50 year lease-purchase agreement was executed in September 2008 between Oklahoma County and the Air Force, covering the 2.5 million square foot (353,000 m˛) facility and 407-acre (1.65 km2). Previously, the largest single building at the base was Building 3001 at 1,300,000 square feet (121,000 m2). Tinker has leased about 4/5 of the facility and will host some current 76th Maintenance Wing operations as well as other Department of Defense missions, including work on the C-17 engines, joint strike fighter engines and core work on the new KC-45 tanker. Work being transferred to the Complex is currently being done at 69 separate facilities on base, many of which are World War II-era temporary buildings located in runway clear zones. Burlington Northern Santa Fe provides a rail spur into the Complex. Modifications to convert the building from auto assembly to aircraft maintenance is expected to be completed sometime after 2013.
    In addition to providing space for the work of the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center, the Tinker Aerospace Complex can also be used to house public/private business partnerships. Currently there are three programs:
    1) Cooperative Research and Development Partnership - objective is to advance science and technology to meet Air Force requirements and transfer of technology into commercial marketplace (CRADA, governed by Title 15 USC 3710a.)
    2) Public Private Partnerships (or Statutory Partnering) where the government acts as a seller to private industry in either a Direct Sales, or Workshare Partnering Agreement, or a Facilities Use Agreement (governed by Title 10 USC 2474.)
    3) Enhanced Use Lease which Requires Congressional approval and full fair market value rent (governed by 10 USC 2667 for underutilized AF assets.)

    Clouding up again – not good weather on approach…


    Tinker Air Force Base is named in honor of Major General Clarence L. Tinker (1887–1942). From Pawhuska, Oklahoma and part Osage Indian, General Tinker received his wings in 1921. General Tinker was a graduate of Wentworth Military Academy who went on to become the first Major General of American Indian descent in U.S. Army history.
    In 1926 he was awarded the Soldiers Medal for returning to his blazing aircraft to rescue a fellow officer. On 7 June 1942, he led a flight of B-24 Liberators on a long-range strike against Japanese forces on Wake Island during World War II. General Tinker was killed when his aircraft presumably crashed into the sea. At the time of his death, General Tinker was commander of the Hawaii-based Seventh Air Force.
    The base was renamed in his honor on 13 January 1948.
    Several of the base's access gates are named in honor of persons with historic ties to the base. On 9 May 1997, base officials placed the following names:
    Tinker Gate, located on the north side, opens onto Air Depot Boulevard. It was named for Major General Clarence L. Tinker, who died in World War II
    Eaker Gate opens onto F Avenue. It was named for General Ira C. Eaker, the first commander of the US Eighth Air Force in Europe during World War II
    Turnbull Gate, at the intersection of Perimeter Road and A Avenue. It was named for Colonel William Turnbull, the first Tinker Air Logistics Center Commander (1942)
    Hruskocy Gate (pronounced ruh-sko-see), the previous Gate 7, on Industrial Boulevard at the NE portion of base. It was named for Brigadier General Thomas C. Hruskocy, the OC-ALC chief of Maintenance Resource Management and Material Management Resource divisions at Tinker (1985–1988)
    Hope Gate, on SE 59th Street. It was named for Colonel John W. Hope, the first commander of the Ground Electronics-Engineering Installation Agency (GEEIA)
    Gott Gate, on the south end of Air Depot Boulevard. It was named for 1st Lieutenant Donald J. Gott, who died in World War II.
    Vance Gate, on the west side of base at Sooner Road. It was named Lieutenant Colonel Leon R. Vance, Jr, who died in World War II.
    In May 1997 the Base named the gates along Douglas Boulevard after aircraft that had been maintained at Tinker:
    Lancer Gate, named for the Rockwell B-1 Lancer
    Liberator Gate, named for the Consolidated B-24 Liberator
    Marauder Gate, named for the Martin B-26 Marauder

    Cool “Report Traffic in sight….” Shot


    In 1940 the War Department was considering the central United States as a location for a supply and maintenance depot. Oklahoma City leaders offered a 480-acre (1.9 km2) site and acquired an option for 960 acres (3.9 km2) additional land. On 8 April 1941, the order was officially signed awarding the depot to Oklahoma City.
    Tinker Field was the site of a Douglas Aircraft factory producing approximately half of the C-47 Skytrains used in World War II. The site also produced a number of A-20 Havocs. Production ceased in 1945.
    The first successful tornado forecast in history was issued on 25 March 1948 from Tinker, about three hours before the tornado hit the southeast corner of the base. A granite marker in the Heritage Airpark on the base commemorates the event. See 1948 Tinker Air Force Base tornadoes for more information.
    On 29 September 1957, Buddy Holly and The Crickets recorded "An Empty Cup", "Rock Me My Baby", "You've Got Love", and "Maybe Baby" in the Tinker Air Force Base Officer's Club.
    On 14 November 1984, a massive fire that burned for two days destroyed or damaged over 700,000 square feet (65,000 m2) in the Air Logistics Center, Building 3001. The resulting repairs cost $63.5 million.
    During much of the 1990s, Tinker was home to the Automated Weather Network switching facility, which consolidated all U.S. military weather data worldwide. Originally located at Carswell Air Force Base, this unit was later moved to an Air Force Weather Agency facility at Offutt Air Force Base.
    In May 1992, Tinker became home to the Navy's "Take Charge and Move Out" (TACAMO) wing, which provides maintenance, security, operations, administration, training and logistic support for the Navy's E-6B Mercury aircraft fleet. TACAMO was the first Navy Air Wing fully integrated on an Air Force base, carrying out a Navy mission in joint operations.
    On 3 May 1999, a deadly tornado caused extensive damage to the northwest corner of the base and surrounding communities. For many days afterwards, Tinker personnel helped by providing shelters, search and rescue, and clean-up efforts.

    Clouds even dwarf an aircraft as massive as this….


    In July 2005, Tinker hosted the US Air Force Thunderbirds as part of their Star Spangled Salute, the base's annual Independence Day celebration.
    Lexington, Oklahoma Rt 74 stretching through town –didn’t realize Ultimate Terrain lights worked well with Tileproxy – sweet!


    The Oklahoma Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul Technology Center (MROTC), a public-private partnership, was started in 2003. MROTC is managed by Battelle Oklahoma and owned by Oklahoma Industries Authority (OIA), a public trust housed in the offices of the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. The first hangars were completed in 2007.
    Tinker celebrated the 30-year anniversary of the E-3 Sentry from 29 June to 1 July 2007. Past and present airmen were invited to swap stories and learn about the latest upgrades.

    More bad weather….


    The sun peaking through as best it can shadows the B-52


    On 13 May 2008, Oklahoma County voters voted in favor of $71.5 million in general obligation bonds, the majority of which has been used to purchase the former General Motors Oklahoma City Assembly plant which is located on the south west section of the base, next to the runway. A 50-year lease-purchase agreement was executed in September 2008 between Oklahoma County and the Air Force, covering the 3.8 million square foot (353,000 m˛) facility and surrounding acreage. Oklahoma County officials paid $55 million to buy the plant from General Motors, which is now called the Tinker Aerospace Complex.
    Neal Schon, Journey's guitarist, was born here.

    The shores of Lake Thunderbird


    Landing/Touchdown in reply ======================================


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  7. #7

    Default

    Flaps coming down


    Tinker is located in Midwest City, Oklahoma. Did you know Midwest City is a city in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, United States, and a part of the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. As of 2009, the population was 57,193, making it the seventh largest city in the state.
    The city was developed in response to talk of an air field being located nearby and named for the Tinker Air Force Base's original designation as the Midwest Air Depot. The city suffered damage during two tornados, the first in May 1999 and the second on May 8, 2003

    Look at that monster! Great atmospheric lighting on this dusk approach


    W.P. "Bill" Atkinson bought land in the area that would become Midwest City after hearing speculation that an air field was going to be built nearby. The city, which was incorporated on March 11, 1943, was named for the air field's original designation as the Midwest Air Depot. When Major General Clarence L. Tinker of Pawhuska, Oklahoma became the first American general killed in World War II (June 7, 1942) near Wake Island, the airfield was renamed in his honor.
    Seward Mott, the director of the Federal Housing Administration's Land Planning Division, helped design the city, gaining national print and broadcast attention, and it became a model for postwar community development. The city incorporated the Mishak community of Czech and German immigrants that had formed in what now is the southeast part of the city.
    In 1947, returning veteran Nicholas Harroz opened Nick's Brett Drive Grocery, which later became Crest

    Gear coming down


    Discount Foods. Soon after its opening, Midwest City citizens opted for a charter-council-city manager form of government to better manage their rapid growth.
    Midwest City's regional hospital was dedicated October 6, 1962, built with the use of bond money. Voters also approved the creation of a junior college district in 1968. Oscar Rose Junior College opened its doors to students in 1970 and is now known as Rose State College.
    The Heritage Park Mall opened in 1978 on North Air Depot and was a prime shopping area in the city for several decades.

    Lined up – two white/red – just what I like to see!






    Almost there….


    In many ways, the city remains relatively unchanged over the last twenty years. Air Depot Blvd spanning from Tinker Air Force Base to Heritage Park Mall still serves as the major commercial district of the city. Of course, many businesses have come and gone, but there are a few that have stood the test of time. Andy's Akropolis, a Greek restaurant started by Larry Hicks, has served many thousands of hungry airmen through the last thirty years. The restaurant, like its city, remains almost the same as it was when it first opened its doors in the 1970s. Midwest City's economic base is heavily dependent upon Federal tax dollars via Tinker Air Force Base. TAFB remains the region's largest employer. The General Motors Oklahoma City Assembly plant was another major employer from its opening in 1979 until its closure in February 2006. GM closed the plant as part as a cost-savings measure. The property was later acquired by Oklahoma County Council and leased to Tinker Air Force Base for $1/year. Tinker renamed the facility the Tinker Aerospace Complex.

    The “Photographic Quality” Touchdown shot I really like this one….


    Portions of Midwest City particularly northwest of Tinker Air Force Base sustained extreme damage from a violent tornado that swept through the southern and eastern areas of the Oklahoma City Metro on May 3, 1999. While it produced F5 damage in South Oklahoma City, damage in Midwest City was rated F4 with numerous destroyed homes and three fatalities. Another strong struck almost exactly the same area four years later on May 8, 2003.

    Taxi to parking. Sorry about the grass, LOL


    City officials worked to revitalize S.E. 29th Street in the early 21st century, leading to the development of a new Town Center Plaza shopping area that faces Interstate 40 and Tinker Air Force Base. The Town Center Plaza development replaced an aging, largely deserted Atkinson Plaza shopping center. In 2003, the Reed Center, a 60,000-square-foot (5,600 m2) convention center, was built. Meanwhile, the Heritage Park Mall has slowly dwindled, becoming an issue of contention in the 2010 mayoral race.

    Shut down, maintenance run complete to Tinker, AFB


    Have a good one all, hope you enjoyed this EXTRA long post of the B-52, something we don’t get to see EVERY day here in the forums. With a tweak I found at Captain Sim, I hope to have her soon have droppable ordinance. Will let you know how it goes and post shots when I get it working!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rapid_City,_South_Dakota
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badlands_National_Park
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pine_Ridge,_South_Dakota
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon,_Nebraska
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keystone,_Nebraska
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Platte,_Nebraska
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambridge,_Nebraska
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_City,_Kansas
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attica,_Kansas
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthrie,_Oklahoma
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinker_Air_Force_Base
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midwest_City,_Oklahoma


    John Thuot II
    A+/Network+
    Last edited by Ragtopjohnny; 02-26-2011 at 02:04 PM.


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Newcastle Upon Tyne
    Posts
    3,470

    Default

    Awesome stuff John. That B52 must have a proper panel, no? If I had the time I'd love to learn how she flies.
    Tom - 737-800 F/O
    Win 7 x64, Q9650 @3.5GHz, 4GB DDR2, 500GB + 1TB SATA2, 1GB HD 6870

  9. #9

    Default

    Tom,

    The B-52 DRIVER package is the one you want. I just got the exterior.

    But many thanks on the Compliments! Glad you like the post!

    John Thuot II
    A+/Network+


    Checkout my new Facebook Page!
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Airpl...05438883035386
    HP Z820 Workstation Intel Xeon 3.30ghz 8 Core Processor 2TB Hard Drive 16 gig of Ram 1125 Power Supply and 2 Gig Nvidia Geforce GTX 970. (YIPPPIE!!!!!)

  10. #10

    Default

    Great post John, I enjoyed the whole thing. Your scenery looks great at 38,000 feet and it was nice seeing OK, Midwest City and Tinker haven't been there in awhile.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Tinker AFB, OK (KTIK)
    By paulfar in forum FS2004
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-21-2017, 01:57 PM
  2. Replies: 20
    Last Post: 02-28-2011, 09:59 AM
  3. Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-25-2011, 11:28 AM
  4. Tinker, Tinker, Take offf already!!!!!
    By BEWARRE in forum MSFS Screen Shot Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-22-2006, 09:26 AM
  5. E3 out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma City...
    By Bill_Browning in forum MSFS Screen Shot Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-14-2005, 11:51 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •