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Thread: HELP- Learn how to use VOR

  1. #1

    Default HELP- Learn how to use VOR

    I am using FSX and trying to learn how to use VOR.

    I have been trying to learn from Lesson - VOR Approach. However, whoever design the lesson is not helpful forme at all.

    I was trying to lineup the niddle (CDI) in the center just trying to see how much I turn in order to get to the center. But the program introduce wind into the program. Furthermore, the instructor's instruction does not match with the program at all. Turning to left or right does not seem to match with the instruction on top left of the screen.

    Is there any other way of learning this?

    Thank you.

  2. #2

  3. #3

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    Hi hfkwong,

    There are also quite a few youtube videos lessons by real instructors that are very good as well.

    Kind Regards

    Bernie
    E8400 @ 3.0GHz, DDR2 Ram 800MHz 4Gb, Vista Home Premium 64Bit, MSI 9800GT @ 512Mb, Philips 22" LCD Widescreen, Cockpit Setup X 5 using Wideview and Widetraffic.

  4. #4

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    Thank you to both of your help.

  5. Default

    If your really interested in flying IFR and don't mind some dry reading. The FAA has quite a substantial library of pdf manuals/howto's. Here is one specifically for the Instrument Flying Handbook:

    http://www.faa.gov/library/manuals/a...ying_handbook/

    Chapter 7 specifically for VOR and other Navigation systems

  6. #6

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    hfkwong, the other replies are pretty much the way to go, especially at navfltsim (mallcott). Additionally, I found that during my training for IFR certification the good ol' manual E6-B flight computer was an invaluable aid for WCA and other things such as fuel consumption, ground speed, including time to next checkpoint (or waypoint). Some crew members here may not agree, which is fine, but I still use it today when I'm planning simulated IFR flights, (and the occasional real-world flight) though most of the time it was for VFR VOR-VOR flights in the beginning of my Private Pilot training (Ground School). I really can't stress it enough. In sims, we can use such a flying aid for fun, and entertainment, and some training, which is cool. Out there, we use them for accuracy and precision, keeping us from making dangerous, even fatal mistakes. After a relatively short period of time with an E6-B you'll be plotting your WCAs like an old hand. It also comes in handy for plotting localizer intercept headings. I also have a Jeppesen electric E6-B as well, though it costs a bit more (much) than a standard human-powered aluminum or plastic model, but unlike the manual job, it can store settings for later use during your flight, keeping you a bit less busy in the cockpit.

    Good luck!

    aputech

  7. #7

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    Thank you to all of you.

    I did some reading on VOR and understand a little bit of the concept. I just need to practice.

    When the CDI deviate to left or right, when I turn the plane, how fast does it respond so that I know I am not over turn , when I pass the VOR, how fast do I need to turn to another direction etc. I just need step by step practice. I was disappointing with the Microsoft lesson program to introduce complication factor into the learning lesson. To make worst, the wording on the screen contradict with the voice instruction.

    I was just wondering how do you practise with FlightSim.

    aputech, yes, after VOR, I still need to go for IFR, there is too much to learn. But I am not going into too much detail yet. It will overload me.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie1 View Post
    Hi hfkwong,

    There are also quite a few youtube videos lessons by real instructors that are very good as well.

    Kind Regards

    Bernie
    The youtube learning is so much easier to understand what is going on. Not the theory of it but how to use it. Thank you so much.

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aputech View Post
    hfkwong, the other replies are pretty much the way to go, especially at navfltsim (mallcott). Additionally, I found that during my training for IFR certification the good ol' manual E6-B flight computer was an invaluable aid for WCA and other things such as fuel consumption, ground speed, including time to next checkpoint (or waypoint). Some crew members here may not agree, which is fine, but I still use it today when I'm planning simulated IFR flights, (and the occasional real-world flight) though most of the time it was for VFR VOR-VOR flights in the beginning of my Private Pilot training (Ground School). I really can't stress it enough. In sims, we can use such a flying aid for fun, and entertainment, and some training, which is cool. Out there, we use them for accuracy and precision, keeping us from making dangerous, even fatal mistakes. After a relatively short period of time with an E6-B you'll be plotting your WCAs like an old hand. It also comes in handy for plotting localizer intercept headings. I also have a Jeppesen electric E6-B as well, though it costs a bit more (much) than a standard human-powered aluminum or plastic model, but unlike the manual job, it can store settings for later use during your flight, keeping you a bit less busy in the cockpit.

    Good luck!

    aputech

    Count me as an 'agree-er'.

    While the E6B rituals, and all those hoops you jump through while convincing an instructor to let you venture off on a solo X-country, are a bit tedious... they drill into your head the important concepts. It comes easier to some, than others, but the theories behind everything from CoG loading, to wind-aloft accounting have to become instinctual.

    Ponder your early flight-planning ... sitting down with charts, a straight-edge and an E6B... take a course-leg from true, to magnetic, to wind adjusted, right down to an exact heading. Now, ponder that no pilot can hold a heading plus/minus a degree or two, and winds-aloft will never be exactly as calculated. Those exercises help cement in a young, pilot's mind, everything that's going on... and that will serve him well during IFR training, and in heavier/faster aircraft... but if you ever takeoff where the exactness of those calculations come into play, you're already on borrowed time.

    Modern flight-planning tools aside.. every pilot needs to 'spin the whiz wheel' regularly.. just to keep the mindset sharp.

    Back on topic.. the VOR skill-set is invaluable. Nailing a radial eliminates E6B navigational guess-work.. and triangulation, or course devation for position calculation (neat stuff), or DME, will nail your ETA/fuel-burn stuff. Throw in a good understanig of NDB tracking.. and you're good to go, and half-way to an instrument rating

  10. #10

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    I,m gonna jump in here and agree,also.In the early days of my flight training,I insisted I would NOT be using charts or the E6B very often as I have a Bendix King AV8OR gps panel mounted and a Garmin 295 backup...However,as I started navigating with charts,E6B and VOR,s,I became hooked...Hardly turn the GPS on anymore... By the way,just got my ticket this past Friday ...Lou PPL/SEL N1472Q(brag brag)

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