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Thread: Kewl

  1. #1
    Lugnut Guest

    Default Kewl

    I was experimenting with the autopilot on the 747. I got the plane down to 100 feet flying over the flats of India at just above stall speed, maybe 180knots. I then went out over the ocean and sped up to 500 Knots while holding this altitude. The plane was fine until I sped up time to 16x. At that speed it would porpoise in and out of the water, submerging all four engines and the nose up to the black mark. It didn't get damaged from this until I tried it going over land where it impacted.

    It also looks pretty good to be 200 feet off the ground going 500 knots and then change the heading ninety degrees. The plane banks very nicely at 16x.

    If you ask me they messed up the sensation of speed with this game a little bit. Going 500knots 100 feet off the ground doesn't look much different than it does when I'm driving at 65. I might believe I'm going 200 when looking out the 747's windows at this speed, but not 500.

    Also, does anyone know the difference between knots and MPH? It seems like there is a slight difference. I don't really know why the flying industry bothers with this. Why not just use MPH or Kilometers per hour instead of this ancient seagoing unit?

  2. #2

    Default RE: Kewl

    Now try to do this WITHOUT the autopilot...and over rough terrain. That'll test your flying skills.

    BTW, 1 knot = 1.15 MPH

    And to answer your final question: (1) old habits die hard, (2) nothing in aviation (except the planes sometimes) moves quickly.

    -----
    Ken G:-wave

  3. #3
    Lugnut Guest

    Default RE: Kewl

    It's especially confusing because k often means Kilometers.

  4. #4

    Default RE: Kewl

    [font size="1" color="#FF0000"]LAST EDITED ON Apr-18-02 AT 04:47PM (EDT)[/font][p]That's why the abbreviation of knot is kt.

    ohh, and I forgot to mention that the abbreviation of kilometer is km, k is usually short for kilo (1,000).

    -----
    Ken G:-wave

  5. #5
    brat54 Guest

    Default RE: Kewl

    Knot isn't just some archaic bit of seagoing terminology but is a usefull measurement of speed that is used in navigation.

    1knot = 1nautical mile per hour ( 1.15 mph or 1.852kmph)
    1nautical mile= 1minute of lattitude (1/60th of a degree)

    So that if you fly due North or South @ 360kt(GS) for one hour you will change your position by 6 degrees N or S .
    Have fun.
    Billb

  6. Default RE: Kewl

    one of my favorite quotes from "Canadian Bacon"

    "The Canadians are always dreaming up ways to ruin our lives; the metric system for crying out loud..."

    No offense to our allies, but that movie is hilarious...

    Jeff
    ________________________________________
    http://hhs1.swsc.k12.ar.us/claybrook/images/sig_new.jpg

  7. #7
    Wippenstein Guest

    Default RE: Kewl

    If you ask me they messed up the sensation of speed with this game a little bit. Going 500knots 100 feet off the ground doesn't look much different than it does when I'm driving at 65. I might believe I'm going 200 when looking out the 747's windows at this speed, but not 500.



    -- There are some car racing sims that simulate the driving speed very well, that is, you get a real sensation of speed. Could it be that FS wasn't meant to show you the speed sensation of 500 kts at 100 ft? ;-)

    Wiljo

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