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littlewing
05-17-2010, 07:41 PM
I've been trying to lock the tail wheel on my Piper Cub J3 that comes with FSX.
I have the gold edition with the acceleration pack. I'm not even sure if the tail wheel is meant to lock. I know for sure it turns about and makes my landings pot luck half the time. If I could lock it for take-off and landing I'd be a very happy chappie.

I've tried to use shift + G but that doesn't seem to work and I don't know what else to try.

andyjohnston
05-17-2010, 07:46 PM
I don't think the Cub has tail wheel lock.

Menemeth
05-17-2010, 07:53 PM
I'm not sure how FSX works, but go into the aircraft.cfg file of the Piper Cub & see if there's a tailwheel_lock=0 in the [contact_points] section. If so, change it to tailwheel_lock=1 ... Then the Shift + G should be able to kick-in. :)

ReggieF5421
05-17-2010, 09:28 PM
There is no tailwheel_lock = in the FSX Piper Cub aircraft.cfg, but you can add it to the contact points section to enable Tail Wheel Lock for the Cub.

littlewing
05-18-2010, 02:03 AM
Thanks, I added that line into the contact points section and it's still the same, so maybe its meant to be that way I guess. It's just that when I land, once the tail comes down the aircraft snakes up the runway, especially if I have a bit of crosswind going on. I can manage decent landings with an outside view but when in the cockpit, not so good as due to the lack of visibility I cannot pick up my bearings on the ground. I wonder if it locks on the real aircraft?

Thanks for your help.

ScatterbrainKid
05-18-2010, 05:36 AM
My FSX Cub (or was it FS2004, I can't remember) had a landing glitch that made it swerve and snake like crazy on touchdown, but I solved it by simply downloading a freeware Cub from somewhere and flying that one instead..:)

simonevans
05-18-2010, 07:32 AM
It is a characteristic of the Cub that it needs `flying` to a parked position and only then can you relax. Two main reasons for squirrelly behaviour on the runway are crosswind, and not using back stick after landing to keep the tail pinned.

ScatterbrainKid
05-18-2010, 07:55 AM
The standard FS2004 Cub definitely had a glitch or bug. Even with no wind and a featherlight slow landing, it used to buck and gyrate like a mechanical bull on touchdown.
I seem to remember the FSX version did the same unless it was later fixed in Accel or whatever

littlewing
05-18-2010, 03:12 PM
I think I'm just going to have to read up and practise on the technique of how to land my Cub. I've started to use the very long runway at Edwards AFB. I don't know how long it is, but its long enough for me. It's great for just rolling along and practising landings. There is definitely a knack to it.

It must be very high up there, my altitude is showing 2300 feet while I'm still on the ground!

Antares
05-18-2010, 05:09 PM
littlewing,

Do you by any chance use a set of rudder pedals? They are pretty much essential for any taildragger because that undercarriage configuration is unstable by nature (a tradeoff made in the early aircraft to get a higher angle of attack for take off.) Pedals will let you "dance" to keep that tail straight and control will get much more straightforward.

In IL-2:1946, the flight modelling is ruthlessly lifelike... it's hard enough landing those taildragging WW2 fighters without ending up on your back because of the huge torque of the engine - you really have to work the rudder - hence the pedals. I find it easiest just to glide them in... but I couldn't land a taildragger at all smoothly until I got my pedals.

Good luck! and many happy landings!

- Antares

littlewing
05-19-2010, 01:44 AM
Do you by any chance use a set of rudder pedals?
- Antares

Hi Antares, no, I'm ashamed to admit, I don't have rudder pedals but I have been thinking that I should - and soon. I was thinking about the new kit that Logitech have made available:
http://www.flixfacts.co.uk/view/mediaplayer/?l=en&demo=&d=12&f=logitech-942-000016&p=9730&g=&txt=&cp=no&btg=WI7&t=fl&

At that moment I just have a Logitech 3D Pro joystick and have the auto rudder box ticked on FSX, which is ok for coordinated turns but no so good for landings with the older type of aircraft with a tail wheel.

olderndirt
05-19-2010, 10:41 AM
Most of my flying was in taildraggers. Keep in mind - how the aircraft looks, reference the runway, as you start your takeoff, is how it should look as you touchdown. If you touchdown straight, it should run straight. There's a critical point where, as you slow, the rudder becomes less effective - careful with your inputs here. Keep the stick all the way back 'til you're done flying. Most modern tailwheels are designed to be steerable thirty degrees either side of center. For ground use in close quarters they can be forced into full caster with brake. This allows you to pivot, essentially in your own length/width.

littlewing
05-19-2010, 03:40 PM
Most of my flying was in taildraggers. Keep in mind - how the aircraft looks, reference the runway, as you start your takeoff, is how it should look as you touchdown. If you touchdown straight, it should run straight. There's a critical point where, as you slow, the rudder becomes less effective - careful with your inputs here. Keep the stick all the way back 'til you're done flying. Most modern tailwheels are designed to be steerable thirty degrees either side of center. For ground use in close quarters they can be forced into full caster with brake. This allows you to pivot, essentially in your own length/width.

Thanks, that is clearly very sound advice that comes from experience and I will adapt to it. These older aircraft are a lot harder to put sweetly on the ground than modern ones with a nose wheel, or so it seems to me anyway. It is an acquired art, I HAVE figured out that much :)

In my search for how to fly a cub I found this: http://www.paragonair.com/N/70497/FLY_A_CUB.pdf

I've not had time to read and digest, but I will. It is definitely worth the time and effort to learn on this little thing. I love it.

Many thanks for your advice sir, it's very much appreciated.

olderndirt
05-20-2010, 09:52 AM
The best book I've found on flying (how to) is 'STICK and RUDDER' by Wolfgang Langewieche. Perhaps your local library would have a copy.

srgalahad
05-20-2010, 11:34 AM
The best book I've found on flying (how to) is 'STICK and RUDDER' by Wolfgang Langewieche. Perhaps your local library would have a copy.

LOL... and with that, you truly earn your nickname;) ..but it is one of the definitive references. Another good one that explains the concepts is here:
http://www.faa.gov/regulations_policies/handbooks_manuals/aircraft/airplane_handbook/ (Chapter 13)

Unless you have rudder pedals taildraggers are difficult in almost any wind conditions as they often require opposite control inputs to counteract the wind. As for the visibility issue, you can either get used to using the edge of the runway for reference (practice, practice...) or shift your viewpoint slightly left or right in the cockpit using the keyboard commands (like resting your head against the side window) to help you see past the nose.

Forget the arbitrary runway centerline... land into wind. Remember that early a/c like the Cub were mostly flown from grass strips and often those were just open fields without defined runways. (in fact, the Cub is easier when not flown off asphalt or concrete runways). If the crosswind is strong, surrender to it and find another runway (or airport). The 'slippery" grass surface makes it a bit easier in a crosswind, but if you are stuck with a paved surface, take off and land at an angle to the centerline and into wind... the very short field performance and slow speeds will help. Taxiing will still be a pain so smaller fields mean less taxi distance.

Keep it slow!!! Taxi speed should be "walking pace" -around 3-5 kts. and in most instances, hold full back pressure on the stick. Not only does it give more authority to the tailwheel if it is steerable but the slight added drag reduces the need for brakes (and potential noseovers). Be gentle!

Rob

Mark Hurst
05-20-2010, 11:34 AM
The best book I've found on flying (how to) is 'STICK and RUDDER' by Wolfgang Langewieche. Perhaps your local library would have a copy.

Great book, and I'd also put in a word for Teach Yourself to Fly by Nigel Tangye, which is a roughly contemporary book along the same lines, but much simpler (and cheaper!). I've even reviewed it for you :)

WUxmU7T2MY8

napamule2
05-20-2010, 01:37 PM
Since you are learning, here is a short 'low & slow' video of the FSX Cub to inspire you. And you need to un-check 'Auto Rudder'. If you have a twist grip joystick, but no pedals, you can still 'master' this jobbie. This is a hand flyer. Throttle 'management' is important. And always use a little up pitch trim and you will find that it then handles a lot easier.
CB
Napamule
Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kCQkXfIuTo

olderndirt
05-20-2010, 04:17 PM
Teach Yourself to Fly by Nigel TangyeI'll look for it. Enjoyed your video - suppose there's a reason for that tree to still be standing right at the threshold.

littlewing
05-20-2010, 04:34 PM
I've just got in from work and powered up my PC and I'm amazed at the response that has come. I have to answer and thank everyone as each was speaking with me.
David (olderndirt) I have a copy of 'STICK and RUDDER' by Wolfgang Langewieche and another one of his books, America From The Air: An Aviators Story. I've not had time to read the second one at all but I am reading Stick And Rudder. He has a funny way with words, he paints pictures with them and his words are better understood for me that way. Thanks for re-affirming the practical value of the book, it is much appreciated.

Robert (srgalahad) thanks for the link to the FAA website and all of the gen that's available. There is much to read there and I'll start with Ch 13 as you suggest as there is a wealth of good flying advice and I will be reading all of it. Thank-you for all of the really great tips on how to control and fly the Cub. I will try and change my viewpoint in the cockpit to see past her nose. That seems the best thing to do as I will never be outside watching in real life so it's best to get used to how it really is for taxiing, take-off and landing. Many thanks again.


Mark, thanks for telling me about the book, Teach Yourself to Fly by Nigel Tangye. I had a look on Amazon and there it was. I'd not heard of it before. Anyway, it's on its way to me now for the princely sum of 3.50 or $5.00. an absolute bargain and perfect for me to read and learn from and it's of the same era and time as Stick And Rudder. I don't think I'd ever have heard of it, had you not told me. The video was very good and your voice over was just right, by describing what was happening and why (and the effect of the why), all the way through. It's a great tutorial and I will learn from that flight. I'm looking forward to my book, it's a hardback one and brand new


Charles (napamule2) thanks for your tips on how to fly the Cub, the video was excellent and there is a lot to be learned from it. I will take it all on board. I will uncheck the tick box for auto rudder as you advise, I'm not doing myself any favours anyway by keeping that box ticked. You can't tick any boxes in a real aeroplane. My joystick has rudder control of sorts, it happens around the twistgrip laterally, and the aircraft responds to the merest input, so yes, there is good and effective rudder control to be given but not through my feet. Rudder pedals are the next thing on my shopping list after my summer vacation is over. I'm taking a trip with my lady to see Chicago and we're visiting what remains of Merril Meigs Field, and will be nipping up to Oshkosh to see what it's like there and for some obscure reason that I can't quite make out, my wife wants to go to Kalamazoo, over in Michigan. Thanks again for the video, it is an excellent video for me because I think I know what I'm looking for now and it's on your vid! The accompanying music was perfect :)


Thanks again for the great support and advice that has flown in to help me, all of it is valued and will be taken on-board and inwardly digested. Cheers ;)

Mark Hurst
05-20-2010, 04:39 PM
I'll look for it. Enjoyed your video - suppose there's a reason for that tree to still be standing right at the threshold.

Dunno, but it makes the approach damned hard! There's a story behind that strip, which is fictional. Check it out over at aussiex.org.

Mark Hurst
05-20-2010, 04:52 PM
Teach Yourself to Fly

Thanks for the kind comments. You can get the Magister in the video from first class simulations - it's quite cheap, and apart from a couple of glitches (flicker in cockpit, stuttering prop) it's really nice. Also lacks a compass, so not very practical for cross-country in FSX. (There's a freeware Magister around someplace but it's awful.)

As luck would have it, I saw two Maggies flying at Shuttleworth last weekend, in formation with a Bucker Bestmann. (Maybe some video coming up soon.) I also had a ride in a Tiger Moth, and just happened to follow the Bestmann out while he was going up to practise!

littlewing
05-21-2010, 07:49 PM
Thanks for the kind comments. You can get the Magister in the video from first class simulations !

Your welcome Mark, I have had a look at the Maggie at First Class Sim and it looks great, an open cockpit and so I can see around and get my bearings. It is a snip at 8. It will be interesting not having a compass aboard to see if I can find my way back home each time. I've now got a beautiful little Cub in my hanger too from A2A it is far, far better than I hoped for in comparison to the FSX standard one. It's like being there.

Cheers :)

napamule2
05-21-2010, 09:07 PM
Well, for starters, you can use 1st 'Shift+Z' line (red text, up top) for your actual 'BRG'. Then you have your 'Map' for locating 'where you are at' (and where you have been, if you ck'ed tracking). Then of course the GPS display. And last, but not least, you can use 'Top Down' view. and zoomed in you can find (actually SEE) that dirt runway (alignment) or to find (SEE) that reference point (lake, inlet, etc) and when zoomed out, you can see 200 miles around. Why stuggle with compass?
CB
Napamule

olderndirt
05-21-2010, 09:53 PM
[FONT="Comic Sans MS"] little Cub in my hanger too from A2AOne thing I really admire about their cub is the front seat ballast - makes for a more interesting flight ;).

littlewing
05-22-2010, 12:24 PM
One thing I really admire about their cub is the front seat ballast - makes for a more interesting flight ;).

You mean the bomb underneath? Scary. I wondered if it is like that on a real Cub.

littlewing
05-22-2010, 12:33 PM
Well, for starters, you can use 1st 'Shift+Z' line (red text, up top) for your actual 'BRG'. Then you have your 'Map' for locating 'where you are at' (and where you have been, if you ck'ed tracking). Then of course the GPS display. And last, but not least, you can use 'Top Down' view. and zoomed in you can find (actually SEE) that dirt runway (alignment) or to find (SEE) that reference point (lake, inlet, etc) and when zoomed out, you can see 200 miles around. Why stuggle with compass?
CB
Napamule

Thanks for the tips on how to get about. I was thinking more by way of realism, and not using the several advangtages at the click of a mouse. Doing it the hard way can be more enjoyable sometimes. ;)

olderndirt
05-22-2010, 12:39 PM
You mean the bomb underneath? Scary. I wondered if it is like that on a real Cub. The young lady who appears in some of the screen shots. :)

napamule2
05-22-2010, 12:53 PM
Yeah, the 'Bomb' (Heidi?) in the front seat. My kind of 'ballast'. She must weight all of 110 lbs. Her hair is 'light' too. Never mind how dizzy her brain gets (hehe). (I guess I'll quit now, but I could carry on about it all day... don't get me started).
CB
Napamule

littlewing
05-22-2010, 02:33 PM
The young lady who appears in some of the screen shots. :)

Young Heidi? Well, that just about brings me full circle doesn't it, because my landings will need to be top drawer from now on if I'm to stop Heidi from wanting to defenestrate on touch-down.

I wasn't too sure what you meant. I thought there was an extra fuel tank under her seat! :D

glasair1
12-06-2011, 07:05 PM
Hi guys,
Just checking. I haven't been around flight sims for a while. Is there a good/simple tail dragger sim, with peddles that helps to get the feel and training in a tail dragger? Some planes are easier than others, so looking for a more difficult tail dragger sim. Inexpensive is good also. take care.